Possible 150 footer

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

Post Reply
ryandallas
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:23 pm

Possible 150 footer

Post by ryandallas » Sun Dec 03, 2017 3:01 pm

I just got back from the Mountain Laurel Open Space, which is located in Fairfield, CT. The open space contains a small river and a sizable ravine, and some young-looking yet impressive Tulip Trees were growing on the ravine's left bank.

Just a disclaimer: I used the straight-up method because I still have not purchased the Nikon 440, and I guesstimated the trees' diameters because I could not locate my measuring tape.

Anyway, without further ado... Here are the measurements:

Tree right after first trail marker, standing to right of small snag..........136.5 ft height, 2 foot diameter.

Marked tree with poison ivy vine..........136.5 ft height, 2 ft diameter.

Tree just before the poison ivy tree........135 ft height, 2 ft diameter.

Tree behind previous two trees..........147 ft height, 2-2 1/2 ft diameter.

Tree just past large red oak (on left), horizontal scar on trunk: 141 ft height, 2 foot diameter.

The fourth tree is most likely over 150 feet. All of the trees in this stand were packed together tightly, so finding tops was really difficult.

Also, interestingly enough, most of the tulips in this stand were not excessively tall. Only a few trees really stood out, and all of them grew alongside the trail.

I will return to this location and do a more thorough report ASAP.

User avatar
ElijahW
Posts: 884
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

Re: Possible 150 footer

Post by ElijahW » Sun Dec 03, 2017 9:31 pm

Ryan,

I just looked up this Mountain Laurel area on Google Earth, and it seems like a promising spot. I see plenty of the tell-tale light green of Tulips in the middle of the ravine. What are you using for a laser? Straight-up shots are perfectly fine, though you’re less likely to hit the true top. Nice to hear from you,

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

ryandallas
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:23 pm

Re: Possible 150 footer

Post by ryandallas » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:27 pm

Thanks for the response, Elijah.

Yes, it's the prefect environment for tall tulips. They get plenty of shelter from the winds.

I'm using a Nikon ProStaff.

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4568
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Possible 150 footer

Post by dbhguru » Thu Dec 07, 2017 12:22 am

Ryan

Do you have a smartphone? If do, you can download clinometer apps.

Most straightup shots are around 80 degrees. Hard to get the head tilted that far back. Assuming an angle of 80 degrees, if you take about 98% of you distance reading and you still reach 150 feet, you’re probsbly safe.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

User avatar
Bart Bouricius
Posts: 562
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 9:41 am

Re: Possible 150 footer

Post by Bart Bouricius » Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:13 pm

If you look for posts back in 2012, you will find that Ryan LeClair, Bob Leverett and I found at least 5 trees in two locations near Trumble Connecticut that exceeded 150'. One, discovered by Ryan, was cristened by Bob the "LeClair Tulip Poplar" . It was then 155' tall, and has probably grown quite a bit in the last 5 years. It would be good to add another over 150' Tulip to the list and also go back to Trumble to see how tall the other big tulips are now. Not sure if this is actually a different Ryan?

ryandallas
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:23 pm

Re: Possible 150 footer

Post by ryandallas » Sat Dec 09, 2017 10:41 am

Bob,

Thanks for the idea! I'm going to read through this thread: http://ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=235&t=6936

Also, thank you for the heuristic with regards to straight-up shots.

Hey, Bart. It's me. I'll never forget that day, and what Bob said: "This looks more like Virginia than Connecticut!"

I have not measured the LeClair TT since then, but I have visited it frequently. It appears to be in good health. Recently a nearby TT fell, narrowly--and thankfully--missing the LeClair TT. The fallen tree now rests only a few feet from the LeClair tree.

User avatar
Bart Bouricius
Posts: 562
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 9:41 am

Re: Possible 150 footer

Post by Bart Bouricius » Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:16 am

Good to hear Ryan, unfortunately I will not be back in the US until April 6th, but if you have not done a measurement by then, I, or a group could come down for a measuring visit. Here is an image of a comparable tree Cedrela odorata in the Meliaceae (mahogany) family from a new (to me) area of old growth here in Costa Rica. It is 154.2 feet, but still a sapling compared to our Panama champion of the same species which was just a tad under 226' or 69 meters.
154.1' tall  Cedrela odorata
154.1' tall Cedrela odorata

ryandallas
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:23 pm

Re: Possible 150 footer

Post by ryandallas » Tue Dec 19, 2017 3:26 pm

Bart,

I will measure the tree in either January or February, but if you want to come down and check my work, please do! I will keep in contact.

That is a beautiful tree. Even the bark looks like tulip tree bark.

ryandallas
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:23 pm

Re: Possible 150 footer

Post by ryandallas » Wed Jan 23, 2019 12:45 pm

ENTS,

I recently returned to this spot and did some real measuring with my Forestry Pro. The tallest trees I found were:

145.5' x 9'3" (measured at 2' above ground level, due to double stem)

148' x 7'8".

This is a very promising spot. I do believe that there is a 150-footer here. I will be returning to this spot throughout the spring.

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4568
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: Possible 150 footer

Post by dbhguru » Sat Jan 26, 2019 9:05 am

Ryan,

Have you maintained a list of CT's tallest trees by species, i.e. the state's RHI? In the hierarchy of Northeastern states, my guess is that they would line up something like this:

1. NY & PA in a real horse race

2. MA because we have so much data

3. CT has the potential to grow very tall hardwoods

4. NJ has immense potential and could move up in the list

5. NH has white pines in spades

6. VT has unexplored potential

7. ME is a story from the past and will largely remain so

8. RI is appropriately last

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

Post Reply

Return to “Connecticut”