Black Oak at Fairfield U., CT

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RyanLeClair
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Black Oak at Fairfield U., CT

Post by RyanLeClair » Tue Apr 03, 2012 2:03 pm

Just measured the big black oak at Fairfield University. 101.4' x 16'9". This tree is one of two giant oaks at the University. The other is a Quercus rubra; it's not very tall, but it's probably fatter than the black oak.

I'll post the pictures once I get back home. It's a wonderful tree--robust, healthy, and FOREST grown. It's a perfect specimen.

RyanLeClair
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Re: Black Oak at Fairfield U.

Post by RyanLeClair » Tue Apr 03, 2012 4:02 pm

Here are those photos of the black oak. The tree is much bigger than anything else around--it must have been spared the saw some time ago.
Attachments
Crown of the Quercus velutina
Crown of the Quercus velutina
My backpack in front of the tree
My backpack in front of the tree
Far shot of tree
Far shot of tree

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dbhguru
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Re: Black Oak at Fairfield U.

Post by dbhguru » Tue Apr 03, 2012 4:17 pm

Ryan,

Good looking black oak. Connecticut has some dillies. Maybe we should start a list of great CT black oaks.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

RyanLeClair
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Re: Black Oak at Fairfield U.

Post by RyanLeClair » Tue Apr 03, 2012 5:39 pm

I would love to do something like that. Do you know of any others besides the E. Granby black oak?

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tomhoward
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Re: Black Oak at Fairfield U., CT

Post by tomhoward » Tue Apr 03, 2012 6:31 pm

Ryan,

That's a fantastic Black Oak! One of the best I've ever seen a picture of. It looks like it's growing in a beautiful grove. How old do you think these oaks are?

The largest Black Oak in Onondaga County where I live is Tree #27 in the North Syracuse Cemetery Oak Grove (45.8" dbh, 105 ft. tall,forest-grown and about 170-190 years old).
The largest Black Oak I've ever seen is an open-grown tree in Mt. Adnah Cemetery in nearby Fulton in Oswego County - single trunk 74" dbh, but no more than 70 ft. tall, and about 150-200 years old.

Tom Howard

RyanLeClair
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Re: Black Oak at Fairfield U., CT

Post by RyanLeClair » Tue Apr 03, 2012 6:55 pm

Thank you, Tom!

I'm not sure how old the trees are. Maybe 200 yrs? Those two from your area seem very impressive, you should post photos of them. Would Oswego Co. be the county near Lake Ontario?

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Chris
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Re: Black Oak at Fairfield U., CT

Post by Chris » Tue Apr 03, 2012 7:20 pm

It certainly does tower over the rest of the trees. I wonder if "they" purposely planned the parking lot so the tree wouldn't be cut down or just dumb luck saved it :/

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tomhoward
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Re: Black Oak at Fairfield U., CT

Post by tomhoward » Wed Apr 04, 2012 8:43 am

Ryan,

Here is a picture of Black Oak #27 in the North Syracuse Cemetery Oak Grove. The picture was taken Nov. 1989 but the tree still looks like this.
Black Oak North Syracuse Cemetery Oak Grove 1989 Medium.jpg
Here is a picture of the 74" dbh Black Oak in Mt. Adnah Cemetery in Fulton, taken Sept. 2002. I am standing next to the tree.
Mt Adnah Cemetery Black Oak medium.jpg
Oswego County is next to Lake Ontario, but Fulton is inland, 12 miles south of the lake.

Tom Howard

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Black Oak at Fairfield U., CT

Post by Larry Tucei » Wed Apr 04, 2012 1:17 pm

Ryan, Big Tree and really good photos. Black Oaks grow down this far in Ms but I have seen few that size. Larry

RyanLeClair
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Re: Black Oak at Fairfield U., CT

Post by RyanLeClair » Thu Apr 05, 2012 7:43 pm

Thank you, Larry. :)

And Tom, those are two very impressive trees.

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