Burr Homestead Beech

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RyanLeClair
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Burr Homestead Beech

Post by RyanLeClair » Thu May 05, 2011 12:28 am

Hi Ents,

Here's a look at a nice European beech (copper?). It's located in Fairfield, on Old Post Rd, at the old Burr Homestead.
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James Parton
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Re: Burr Homestead Beech

Post by James Parton » Thu May 05, 2011 9:10 am

Ryan,

Georgeous tree! It looks like it may have some age to it as well.

Down here in NC it would already have some developing leaves on it.
James E Parton
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New Order of Druids

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RyanLeClair
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Re: Burr Homestead Beech

Post by RyanLeClair » Thu May 05, 2011 2:52 pm

James,

The house is over two-hundred years old, so do you think that that the tree could be 150-200 years, or even more, assuming it was planted as an ornamental?

As for the leaves, I envy you greatly for your warmer climate! However, as of now I'm at school in PA, so I'm enjoying the benefits of a lower latitude anyways :) Unfortunately, the woods are overtaken with Norway Maple...it should be an ENTS initiative to get this tree (Norways) classified as a weed species, if it isn't already. I've heard that Norways may eventually replace our native Sugar, red, and silver maples, and the oaks, if measures aren't taken.

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Burr Homestead Beech

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri May 06, 2011 6:58 am

Ryan, Nice Beech. I'm not sure if it's a Copper or American. Beautiful tree anyway. When I was in New England a few years ago I saw my first Copper Beach trees, Awesome tree. Keep finding those big trees. Good photos to! Larry

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James Parton
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Re: Burr Homestead Beech

Post by James Parton » Fri May 06, 2011 11:02 am

Ryan,

The Burr Beech reminds me of two European beeches I have seen here. One big one at the Biltmore Estate that is probably between 110-120 years old and another large one at Calvary Episcopal Church that might be as old as 150. They are awesome trees!

We have Norway Maple around here but I have not heard of it being an invasive in our area. They are usually street or yard trees. I have read that like Ailanthus and Black Walnut they have a chemical that inhibits undergrowth from growing under them which would give them a competitive advantage against most of our native trees.
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

RyanLeClair
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Re: Burr Homestead Beech

Post by RyanLeClair » Fri May 06, 2011 1:22 pm

Thanks guys for the feedback! Larry, these truly are amazing trees. They are considered the aristocrat of ornamental broadleafs in the region, famed Horticulturalist Michael Dirr has described them as such. And James, I believe juglone is the toxic chemical emitted by Walnuts, don't know about the ailanthus. As for the Norways:

http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/in ... _maple.htm

--Ryan

greenent22
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Re: Burr Homestead Beech

Post by greenent22 » Sat May 07, 2011 3:38 am

nice, tree

it kind of reminds me of the one on the main lawn of Tufts University

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KoutaR
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Re: Burr Homestead Beech

Post by KoutaR » Sun May 08, 2011 4:48 am

It is interesting that in the linked site, Norway maple (A. platanoides) is said to be extremely shade tolerant. In Europe, it is considered only moderately shade tolerant, and less shade tolerant than sycamore maple (A. pseudoplatanus).

Kouta

RyanLeClair
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Re: Burr Homestead Beech

Post by RyanLeClair » Sun May 08, 2011 1:01 pm

Kouta,

That's interesting, do you think the site is exaggerating? Just curious. Norways do seem very shade tolerant compared to American species, here in Pennsylvania it's not rare to see a Norway sapling 1-foot tall doing very well in complete shade.

Greenent,

Sounds like a neat tree, do you think you post a pic? :)

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KoutaR
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Re: Burr Homestead Beech

Post by KoutaR » Sun May 08, 2011 4:41 pm

Young saplings 1-2 ft tall are shade tolerant indeed, and as Norway maple is a prolific seeder there is often a plentiful regeneration around mature forest trees. However, the growth of saplings stagnates quickly, and they need rather plentiful light to reach maturity. Consequently, Norway maple is usually absent in Central European old-growth forests. More shade tolerant Sycamore maple is the only maple species consistently present in Central European beech dominated old-growth forests. Norway maple is present in sites where beech is unable to form a closed canopy. It is also plentiful in "urban" forests and other secondary forests, which have been more open in the past.

I would say the site is exaggerating, but I haven't seen any shade tolerance comparisons between European and American trees. Norway maple is surely able to gain a strong foothold in open secondary stands, and this is probably what the site is meaning.

Kouta

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