unknown oak

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tclikesbigtrees
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unknown oak

Post by tclikesbigtrees » Sun Oct 18, 2015 3:59 pm

My family and I were in Lancaster County, PA this weekend for our annual trip. While at Hershey Farm for their buffet this morning, I saw this oak tree with unusually long acorns. I don't know the variety and was wondering what it is. I have attached some photos.
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IMG_6775[1].JPG
IMG_6776[1].JPG
IMG_6779[1].JPG

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Rand
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Re: unknown oak

Post by Rand » Sun Oct 18, 2015 7:32 pm

Looks like English Oak (Quercus Robur)

https://www.google.com/search?q=Quercus ... Ijj3dOY%3D

We had a nice one in columbus, ~100 yrs old that the state built a big parking lot around, and promptly killed it. Rather cheesed me off, as it was a beautifully formed tree.

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Lucas
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Re: unknown oak

Post by Lucas » Sun Oct 18, 2015 7:59 pm

I didn't think it was robur at first but the leaf horns, acorn stalks and long acorns says robur. There may be a bit of something else in it though. The leaf is more like white oak than usual.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Rand
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Re: unknown oak

Post by Rand » Sun Oct 18, 2015 8:36 pm

I'm not familiar enough with the species to say what the natural range of variability of it's leaves are (White and red oaks for example, can vary a lot) One of the european guys (Kouta, Jeroen) could probably tell you more.

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John Harvey
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Re: unknown oak

Post by John Harvey » Sun Oct 18, 2015 10:51 pm

My father in law has in English oak on his vineyard in Gettysburg PA. I agree with the ID.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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KoutaR
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Re: unknown oak

Post by KoutaR » Mon Oct 19, 2015 5:10 am

Looks Q. robur.

Kouta

Jeroen Philippona
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Re: unknown oak

Post by Jeroen Philippona » Mon Oct 19, 2015 5:48 am

To me it looks more like a hybrid of Q.robur with another white oak species. The leaf stalks in typical robur are very short, with 2 tiny lobes (auricles) at the base . The leaves are deeper than in typical robur but the long stalks on the acorns are like robur, although I never saw such reddish acorns on robur. But robur is a very variable species hybriding a lot with other species (in Europe most often Q. petraea but also several other species), so it will probably cross as well with American species like Q. alba. There are also several very related species in South-eastern Europe like Q. pedunculiflora.

Jeroen

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KoutaR
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Re: unknown oak

Post by KoutaR » Mon Oct 19, 2015 8:12 am

The lobes in the lower photo are very deep, indeed. Could be a hybrid. The acorn color may be so reddish due to camera/software settings (increased color saturation). I think the leaf stalks are not too long for Q. robur, there are also some very short stalks in the upper photo.

tclikesbigtrees
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Re: unknown oak

Post by tclikesbigtrees » Mon Oct 19, 2015 10:38 am

Thanks guys. I have seen that tree many times but never thought much about it. Now that I look at trees more then I used to, I notice when I see something different. That may be the only one that I have ever seen.

Tom

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