Prohpecy Creek Park Sycamore

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George Fieo
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Prohpecy Creek Park Sycamore

Post by George Fieo » Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:02 pm

ENTS,

On 9/17/10 I had the opportunity to visit Prophecy Creek Park, Blue Bell. It's an old farm that is owned and maintained by Whitpain Twp. The sycamore measures 22'10" x 101.3' x 111' and is the largest tree in the township. The sycamore is said to be approximately 300 years old. I'm not certain of the trees age but I believe the farmhouse dates back to the early to mid 1800's and the township was founded in 1701.
Full view of the Prophecy Creek Park Sycamore.
Full view of the Prophecy Creek Park Sycamore.
Base of the Prophecy Creek Park Sycamore
Base of the Prophecy Creek Park Sycamore
The 100 acre Briar Hill Preserve adjoins Prophecy Creek Park and is owned by the Wissahickon Valley Watershed Association. The preserve is a mix of fields, young scrub succession, and some wetland and upland woods. There are several old boundry trees that line through the much younger wood. The largst being a sycamore with a girth of 19'. I didn't measure their heights but I would estimate them to be 70-90' tall.
Briar Hill Preserve 19' CBH Sycamore
Briar Hill Preserve 19' CBH Sycamore
George

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James Parton
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Re: Prohpecy Creek Park Sycamore

Post by James Parton » Tue Oct 12, 2010 11:57 pm

WoW, talking about whoppers!

James Parton
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dbhguru
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Re: Prohpecy Creek Park Sycamore

Post by dbhguru » Wed Oct 13, 2010 7:17 am

George,

A monster. You win. Yesterday, Will and I measured the West Springfield giant. It is 20.25 feet in girth and 104 feet tall, and covered in vines. I vote for your tree.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
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gnmcmartin
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Re: Prohpecy Creek Park Sycamore

Post by gnmcmartin » Wed Oct 13, 2010 10:10 am

All you ENTS tree measurers: I want you all to know that I am one frustrated little puppy. There are so many trees I want to measure, but I just can't get free to do it. This sycamore makes me think about how I need to measure one in Arlington, VA--a quadruple trunked one that might lead to discussions about whether it is one or four trees. I believe it is one tree grown as coppice, and fused. Anyway, if some kind of trunk diameter measurement could be allowed, I think this just might be the champ. And it is tall and still growing upward. I won't hazard any guess about its height. And spread! Well, I will, at some point, get to that tree, talk to the owner, and get permission to measure it. Then we can discuss how to deal with the "legitimacy" of the measurements for any database. There are a couple of others out here in Northern VA that should be measured--getting to these and/or getting permission could be more tricky.

--Gaines

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edfrank
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Re: Prohpecy Creek Park Sycamore

Post by edfrank » Wed Oct 13, 2010 10:32 am

Gaines,

If you mean by coppice and fused trunks at the base, they would have more than one pith at ground level, they are by definition a multitrunk tree even if they have fused together at the base or if they are growing from a single root mass. A single trunk tree is one that has a single pith at ground level. In most cases it's girth can be measured at 4.5 feet. If it is low branching, but still would only have a single pith at ground level, it is still considered a single trunk tree, and should be measured at the narrowest point below the branching and that height noted.
Multitrunk Trees This is the second largest category of tree forms. These are trees and shrubs that have more than one stem growing from a single root mass. these trees have a fused base area that consist of multiple piths at ground level, These generally form when the original stem of the tree was damaged, broken, or browsed by animals, damaged from falling (natural or man-caused) This results in new stem sprouting from the root mass. In general these stems are all of similar age and size, but will often reduce to developing one, or a few dominant stems. Trees commonly growing in flood plains, such as Silver Maple and Willow, are often are damaged during floods and this may be the most common growth form of the species. Trees growing as second growth forest after timbering operations also have a higher than normal incidence of multiple trunk trees due to damage of small trees during the operation and from stump sprouts. The different stems of these multi-trunked trees often flair outward. The fused base should be measured at a height of 4.5 feet, if it extends that high, or measured at the narrowest point below 4.5 feet when it does not extend that high. The number of individual stems making up the measured girth should be noted, in addition any stems not included in the girth measurement should also be noted. Where possible the girth of the largest single stem should be measured at 4.5 feet or at whatever height it becomes separate from the multi-trunk mass for comparison with single trunk trees. Optionally the girth and height of each individual stem making up the multitrunk tree can be measured. The height of the tallest stem, and the crown spread of the multi-trunk mass should also be measured. A website from Great Britain http://www.treeregister.org/measuringtrees.shtml is the first site I have found that tries to define how to measure multi-trunk trees, although I am not following their protocol. It should be noted that stems developing from a very large stump, will have a very large hollow in the center that will falsely inflate a 4.5’ height girth measurement. This situation should be noted.
http://www.nativetreesociety.org/multi/index_multi.htm


These multitrunk forms are perfectly legitimate growth forms and should be measured, but ther measurements should be kept as a separate category from true single trunk trees.

.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Prohpecy Creek Park Sycamore

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri Oct 15, 2010 6:28 am

George, Awesone tree! Its got to be close to that age. I wish Sycamore would reach that size down south. Great trees! Larry

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djluthringer
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Re: Prohpecy Creek Park Sycamore

Post by djluthringer » Wed Nov 17, 2010 8:41 pm

George,

VERY nice sycamore. What a dandy! What county was it in?

Dale

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George Fieo
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Re: Prohpecy Creek Park Sycamore

Post by George Fieo » Sat Nov 20, 2010 4:07 pm

Dale,

It's in Montgomery County. The sycamore was originally nominated to the state list in 2009 by Joseph Steuer.

George

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