Ander's Run Natural Area and Buckaloons Recreation Area, PA

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djluthringer
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Ander's Run Natural Area and Buckaloons Recreation Area, PA

Post by djluthringer » Wed Apr 27, 2011 2:20 pm

On 4/13/2011 Carl Harting, Steve Hallow and I met for a measuring trip to Ander's Run Natural Area and Buckaloons Recreation Area in Warren County, PA. It was great to get together with everyone. Even though we couldn't get on the river (the Allegheny is still too high), we got a lot done. Here's the stats for 4/13/11:

Anders Run N.A.

Species CBH Height Comments

E. larch 10.8(2x) 115.2 was 10.8(2x) x 114.8 on 3/5/09, 2nd tallest known in PA

Nordmann fir 7.3 96 was 7.2 x 95.5 on 3/5/09, 194 AF points, cored 117 rings slightly missed center, 3.5ft up fm base

Noway spruce 10.5 137.4 was 10.5 x 135.2 on 10/18/06, cored 141 rings to ctr, 3.3ft up fm base

white pine 7.1 133.8 Twisty Top
white pine 10 151 was 9.8 x 144.9 on 4/16/03, 41 49.460N x 79 16.511W
white pine N/A 160 Burl Queen, was 11.6 x 155.8 on 3/23/04, tac 419, 41 49.484N x 79 16.962W
white pine 11.4 160.2 was 11.3 x 159.6 on 3/23/04 tac 415, 41 49.547N x 79 16.628W

Anders Run now has 2, 160ft class pines, and 7, 150ft class pines. If the old state champ Cornplanter Pine was still alive, that'd make 3 living pines in the 160ft class. Anders is the 3rd best place in the state to see tall pines. 1st Cook Forest, 2nd Hearts Content, 3rd Anders Run.

Dunns Eddy Rd (~half mile down river from Anders Run, Benedict Farm)

shagbark hickory 14 87.5 state champ (likely old limb fuse at CBH) was 13.7 x 83.9 on 10/18/06, 270AF points


Irvine, PA (~half mile north of Buckaloons)

white oak 17.8 87.5 across road from church


Buckaloons Recreation Area

Am. hornbeam 2.7 33

bitternut hickory 5 75.1+
bitternut hickory 12 108 41 50.122N x 79 15.534W

black cherry 9.1(2x) 84.1+

black locust 6.6 85

black walnut 7.6 101.5

black willow 7.8 78.5

dotted hawthorne 1.9 45 tac 915, 41 50.270N x 79 15.366W
tallest known in NE is on site 16 is 3.1 x 45.4

E. hemlock 6.2 96

E. larch 7.4 113.5

green ash 6.2 78.1+

hackberry 4.8 76.5

moss cypress 6 87.7 was 5.9 x 86.4 on 4/2/09, 3rd largest known in state, 166 AF points

N. red oak 7.1 107

shagbark hickory 6.6 89
shagbark hickory 5.6 89.5

silver maple N/A 100

sugar maple 8 84
sugar maple 9.8 84

sycamore 13.7(2x) 118.5
sycamore N/A 123.1
sycamore N/A 129
sycamore N/A 129
sycamore N/A 129.1
sycamore N/A 131.5

tuliptree 10.2(2x) 98

white ash 12.6 109 41 50.261N x 79 15.375W

white oak 14.4(2x) 88.5
white oak 8.8 102.5

white pine 11 108
white pine 10.8 127
white pine 9.2 135


Buckaloons Rucker Index = 108.8

E. white pine 9.2 135
sycamore N/A 131.5
white ash 12.6 109
tuliptree 9.9 108.5
bitternut hickory 12 108
N. red oak 7.1 107
white oak 8.8 102.5
black walnut 7.6 101.5
silver maple N/A 100
black locust 6.6 85

The 130ft class white pine and sycamore where nice surprises at Buckaloons. I had no initial intention of getting a Rucker Index for the site, but the further we progressed along Irvine Run into the "tallish" sycamore stand along the creek it was apparent we'd have enough data for an RI. Also, I could here Ed in the back of my head giving me a rash if we didn't...

The fat bitternut on Irvine Run was also nice. It was the largest I've personally measured. the tree has been beat up pretty bad over the years, but is still a solid tree. Definitely has a little age to it. Wouldn't be surprised if it went over 200 years old.

Dale


Allegheny River

At the end of the day we went up-river on Hemlock Road towards the Kinzua Dam scanning the islands for tall trees. Steve Halow was able to measure one sycamore across the open water on Wardwell Island (about 3.2miles down river from Kinzua Dam) to 137ft high. There were other sycamore on this island that would also break into the low 130ft class. Ed, looks like we've got a future float from the dam down to the Buckaloons in the works...

Dale

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edfrank
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Re: Ander's Run Natural Area and Buckaloons Recreation Area,

Post by edfrank » Wed Apr 27, 2011 2:35 pm

Dale,

Congratulations. It sounds like you guys had a great trip. I am sorry my bronchitis problems kept me from participating. I am on some better drugs now and am raring to go for the next one. I wanted to comment about the location of Irvine Run. You are talking about it in the vicinity of Buckaloon - it runs down the edge of the campgrounds on the northern side of Brokenstraw Creek.
buckaloons_map.JPG
Babbitt (1855) provides a description of area of Brokenstraw Creek and Brokenstraw Island. The map shows present day Anders Run marked as Irvin's Run:  
brokenstraw4.JPG
BIG BROKENSTRAW CREEK
[Warren, 6 miles]

This creek rises in Erie County, Penn, and after receiving the waters of Coffee, Hair, Spring, Mullengar, and the Little Brokenstraw Creeks, empties into the Allegheny, seven miles below Warren. The Little Brokenstraw takes its rise in Chautauqua County, not far from the head-waters of French Creek, and empties into the Big Brokenstraw, seven miles above its mouth.

The lumbering business is extensively pursued on all the tributaries. Several millions of feet of lumber, together with an immense amount of shingles, yearly leave this point, and find a market throughout the country. Brokenstraw Eddy is a few rods below the mouth of this creek, upon the right side, forming a very excellent place for preparation for lumbermen.

The village and the land for a considerable distance around is owned by Dr. Wm. A. Irvine, grandson of Gen. Wm. Irvine, of the Revolutionary army, and who was for several years Commissioner of the State, in superintending the survey of lands northwest of the Allegheny, under a law of 1792.

Dr. Wm. A. Irvine inherited this land from his father, the late commissory Gen. Calendar Irvine, who came to this place in 1795, erected a cabin, and placed it in charge of a faithful negro servant, by way of perfecting an "actual settlement."

…The traveler in passing thorough the vicinity will notice a neat little stone Church, situated in a beautiful grove, and also a stone School House on the opposite dise of the road. These, we are told, were erected at the expense of Mrs. Dr. Wm. A. Irvine, who possessed an ample fortune of her own.

One can easily form some idea of the taste and refinement of this amiable lady, when we view the scenery around this place, for she has chosen one of Nature's most inviting retreats, and one every way calculated to draw the thinking mind from nature up to nature's God.

BROKENSTRAW ISLAND.
[Warren 7 3/4]

He we have the channel to the right. The island is about three-fourths of a mile long, and contains 63 acres of cultivated land. From the head of the island, in low water, keep near the middle. When approaching Dr. Irvine's house, incline to the right, to void the bar on the left, about opposite the house. After passing the bar, keep a little to the right of the middle down to the foot of the Island. The water is always deeper along the right shore.
On the map of this area (above), William A. Irvin’s House (Dr. Irvine) is located adjacent to Irvin’s Run (Ander’s Run) just downstream of where it flows into the Allegheny River. A mill race is also shown on the map immediately downstream of the mouth of Brokenstraw Creek. Brokenstraw Island is, of course, what we are calling Crull's Island today.

Ed

Babbitt, E. L. 1855. The Allegheny pilot : containing a complete chart of the Allegheny River showing the islands and bars and low water channel, from Warren to Pittsburgh, with directions for navigating the same with rafts, flat-boats, etc…Also, a table of distances for all ... principal western navigable rivers. E. L. Babbitt, Publisher and Printer, Freeport, PA. in Darlington Library Texts http://digital.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin ... c=darltext

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