"Progress"

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JHarkness
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Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 5:44 pm

"Progress"

Post by JHarkness » Thu Sep 13, 2018 8:29 pm

I'm sure some of you may have heard of this place, Cricket Valley Energy Center is a large scale natural gas power plant in the town of Dover, New York. When finished it will supposedly be the largest of it's kind east of the Mississippi River.... Current calculations place it's carbon dioxide output at 10 Million tons annually, not to mention the dozens of other gases, including formaldehyde, that it will release into the atmosphere as well. Despite New York State's fracking ban, this is being built anyway.

Here's what NY's Department of Environmental Conservation has to say on the matter: "This new plant not only offers environmental benefits but also economic benefits to the state and local economy. The project furthers the Governor's efforts to create efficient energy generation and improve reliability, particularly in the lower Hudson Valley. Increased reliability and reduced energy costs will promote economic growth in New York. The project site, an inactive industrial landfill, would be cleaned up as part of its construction"

Well, let's take a look at the "environmental benefits" it offers....
CVE_2015.png
CVE_2016.png
CVE_2017.png
CVE_2018.png

"Additionally, 2.4 acres of wetland adjacent area will be restored for wildlife habitat."
CVE_2018_Wetland.png
This wetland was a forested swamp of red maple, black ash and hemlock three years ago, the trees were actually considerably older than on the surrounding property as the wetland hadn't been farmed, yes, this and some of the other damaged wetlands (though less significantly) on the property had mature trees. It has been reduced from 2.4 acres in size to 0.8 acres. Another wetland here has been cut in half to make way for a parking lot. The DEC also claims that this is "habitat restoration".



The wetland across the railroad tracks is federally protected and is one of the largest freshwater wetlands in New York State, it has also only suffered minimally from pollution and has been recovering from extensive deforestation and farming along it's edges, it's presently in pristine condition, except for a few patches of stray purple loosestrife and phragmites, but it's future is now threatened by this power plant as well.

On top of the immediate ecological damage, it's claimed that this plant has "created local jobs", but yet all of the crews building the place are from out of state, and it's quite likely that the management and most of the staff when it's operational will be from out of state or from New York City. Additionally, they've clearcut hundreds of acres of forest, some young, some mature to make way for new large-scale power lines running west to several large towns and small cities along the Hudson River. Not mentioned by the DEC, they've bought off a 70-acre farm field several miles away, completely paved it, clear cut a patch of trees that were in the way of an access road, and removed several large "wolf trees" that lined the field, sugar maple and red oak, I believe. This site has become their staging area for construction, when finished they will abandon it and "sell" it back to it's previous owner or anyone who wants to develop it.

But guess what? The residents of the town of Dover are happy about this, why? Because it has reduced their taxes minimally, however, their taxes are expected to rise significantly over the next few years due to this place... Some even got excited seeing the field paved over as they thought they were "finally" getting a Walmart in their town.... I'm not kidding, that was the rumour in town for the better part of a year until CVE finally said that they were using the field.

Now here's the kicker, DEC have officially recognized this site as producing "renewable energy"....

If they were going to do this kind of damage to a site, clearcutting, grading, why not atleast put in solar panels, you might ask? Well, because people are pigs when it comes to electricity and solar won't produce enough electricty to keep their TVs running 24/7.... The problem is as much the consumers as it is the producers.


Is this really what our world is coming to? Is there hope for the survival of any species on our precious earth, including ourselves, while those in "authority" call the continued explotiation of our natural resources and degredatation of native ecosystems "progress"?
"Be not simply good; be good for something." Henry David Thoreau

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RayA
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 10:21 am

Re: "Progress"

Post by RayA » Fri Sep 14, 2018 10:45 am

JHarkness wrote: Is there hope for the survival of any species on our precious earth, including ourselves, while those in "authority" call the continued explotiation of our natural resources and degredatation of native ecosystems "progress"?
To answer that question: for our species... I'm doubtful, sadly.

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dbhguru
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: "Progress"

Post by dbhguru » Fri Sep 14, 2018 10:54 am

Joshua,

Agree with Ray. Our species will not live up to its potential.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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JHarkness
Posts: 245
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 5:44 pm

Re: "Progress"

Post by JHarkness » Fri Sep 14, 2018 4:23 pm

Ray, Bob,

I completely agree. I don't see how our species can possibly survive in the long run while we continue to do things like this. I just hope that we don't take too many other species with us in whatever disaster we cause... Imagine a world where governments were focused on the protection of our planet, where humans would consciously reduce their population to carrying capacity (or perhaps even less) for our planet, where the public would see the importance of nature and live with it every day. Sadly, I don't believe a world like this is ever going to exist. But who knows, if we can educate the public enough, perhaps future generations will develop more of a sense of nature and will take action to save it and ourselves. The greedy pigs of today are only going to be alive for so long, if there could be fewer of them in future generations, think of the difference that alone could make? I think that's possible, but who knows with the direction we're headed in presently.
"Be not simply good; be good for something." Henry David Thoreau

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