Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

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Lucas
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Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by Lucas » Fri Feb 26, 2016 4:02 pm


Click on image to see its original size

Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine 88 feet high in 10 years, South Africa. A man for scale, lower right


Click on image to see its original size

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinus_radiata

I dont see much on Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine here but it is amazing it went from virtually extinct to the most planted pine in the world.

"Pinus radiata is a coniferous evergreen tree growing to between 15–30 m (49–98 ft) in height in the wild, but up to 60 m (200 ft) in cultivation in optimum conditions"
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by Erik Danielsen » Fri Feb 26, 2016 4:17 pm

I wonder if this relates in any way to the findings related to certain european conifers growing more successfully in unfamiliar soil as they found the inhabiting fungal communities more hospitable- perhaps in Monterey Pine's very limited native range there's a fungus or other organism common to the soil communities that severely limits its growth potential. Maybe that's how its range got so limited in the first place- a successful and widespread species until the wrong organism developed and crippled its ability to compete.

Of course, selective breeding and other human efforts have been kind to cultivated monterey pines as well.

Joe

Re: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by Joe » Fri Feb 26, 2016 6:15 pm

Lucas wrote: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine 88 feet high in 10 years, South Africa. A man for scale, lower right
Too bad that stand wasn't thinned because those trees would be much "fatter" and look much nicer. I wonder how fast the diameter would have grown if thinned.
Joe

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Rand
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Re: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by Rand » Sat Feb 27, 2016 1:21 pm

Erik Danielsen wrote:I wonder if this relates in any way to the findings related to certain european conifers growing more successfully in unfamiliar soil as they found the inhabiting fungal communities more hospitable- perhaps in Monterey Pine's very limited native range there's a fungus or other organism common to the soil communities that severely limits its growth potential. Maybe that's how its range got so limited in the first place- a successful and widespread species until the wrong organism developed and crippled its ability to compete.
I read a speculative article about this. Turns out Monterey Pine was a lot more common during the ice age. They speculate that when the climate warmed, the trees didn't migrate fast enough, and got boxed into a less than ideal habitat, by even worse habit on all sides. It's a bit too warm in their current range, but they soldier on.

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Lucas
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Re: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by Lucas » Sat Feb 27, 2016 1:46 pm

Joe wrote:
Lucas wrote: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine 88 feet high in 10 years, South Africa. A man for scale, lower right
Too bad that stand wasn't thinned because those trees would be much "fatter" and look much nicer. I wonder how fast the diameter would have grown if thinned.
Joe
Yes, the caption did say that they were not thinned and should have been. They were on average about 9 inches dbh.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Lucas
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Re: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by Lucas » Sat Feb 27, 2016 1:49 pm

Rand wrote:
Erik Danielsen wrote:I wonder if this relates in any way to the findings related to certain european conifers growing more successfully in unfamiliar soil as they found the inhabiting fungal communities more hospitable- perhaps in Monterey Pine's very limited native range there's a fungus or other organism common to the soil communities that severely limits its growth potential. Maybe that's how its range got so limited in the first place- a successful and widespread species until the wrong organism developed and crippled its ability to compete.
I read a speculative article about this. Turns out Monterey Pine was a lot more common during the ice age. They speculate that when the climate warmed, the trees didn't migrate fast enough, and got boxed into a less than ideal habitat, by even worse habit on all sides. It's a bit too warm in their current range, but they soldier on.
I read the same somewhere. Similar stories are postulated for other rare trees.


Click on image to see its original size

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupressus_macrocarpa

Monterey cypress was even rarer but does fine in other places.

Seqouia has an oddly limited range.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

Joe

Re: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by Joe » Sat Feb 27, 2016 3:06 pm

Lucas said, "Yes, the caption did say that they were not thinned and should have been. They were on average about 9 inches dbh."

Yuh, just like on Mass. state forests. Many plantations were created in the '30s and none were ever thinned- until they finally clearcut them in the last decade making a mess and aggravating the public.
Joe

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Sat Feb 27, 2016 4:29 pm

During an extended trip to New Zealand 16+ years ago I purchased a book titled "The Natural World of New Zealand: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of New Zealand's Natural Heritage," by Gerald Hutching. Here's the entry on Pinus radiata:
radiata2.jpg
radiata.jpg
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Don
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Re: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by Don » Sat Feb 27, 2016 5:02 pm

I'm remembering a rule of thumb from forestry classes...angiosperms (hardwoods) growing fast grow strong; gymnosperms (softwoods) growing fast grow brash. Brash wood is brittle, breaking cleanly across grain. I think that the S. African photo showing 10 year old trees that were 88 feet high would likely be of a brash nature, and perhaps of even limited use for fiber.
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DougBidlack
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Re: Pinus radiata, the Monterey pine

Post by DougBidlack » Sat Feb 27, 2016 5:41 pm

Does 88' in 10 years seem reasonable to everyone else? I think I can count at least 15 whorls on one of the pines and I can't see the top. Is this species able to produce two or more whorls per year?

Doug

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