East Coast Albinos

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Mark Collins
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East Coast Albinos

Post by Mark Collins » Sat Jan 02, 2016 5:04 pm

NTS,
I wanted to share three photos of albinism occurring in hemlock, spruce, and fir trees that I found along the Appalachian Trail this summer. I first heard about, and saw albinism occur in redwoods out west. I was very excited to see it occur in east coast trees as well. If nothing else, it was a neat way to connect to the redwoods while traveling along an eastern trail...

Click on image to see its original size
hemlock (above)

Click on image to see its original size
spruce (above)

Click on image to see its original size
fir (above)

Devin
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Re: East Coast Albinos

Post by Devin » Sat Jan 02, 2016 10:48 pm

Wow very cool, on the east coast I can only recall seeing variegation on broad leafs, usually because of a virus. Those shoots look like some legit albinos.

This paper mentions, along with genetic factors, cooler temperatures and reduced light induced albinoism in oats and barley. I wonder if that is true with these conifers on the east coast, which in general are restricted to cooler temperatures, heavier cloud cover, and shorter growing seasons.

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... id_Culture

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Will Blozan
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Re: East Coast Albinos

Post by Will Blozan » Sun Jan 03, 2016 9:56 am

Interesting. But isn't an albino an organism, not a part?

-Will

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Mark Collins
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Re: East Coast Albinos

Post by Mark Collins » Sun Jan 03, 2016 4:21 pm

Devin, Will,

I found the fir to be the most visually interesting. It had the pure white leaders as you can see in the original post (above), many regular green branches, and several variegated branches, as well as what I assume one would call chimeric branches, where the needles were split green and white (below).

Click on image to see its original size

The hemlock was pretty much all green except for a few branches with the green/white split needles, as well as a couple variegated branches. The spruce was all green except for a couple branches as well. All three were smaller trees, and probably unnoticeable to a passerby. Also interesting is that these albinos seem so random, I can't seem to put together any patterns as to why and where they grow where they do.

I think if Zane Moore happens to see this, he is well suited to answer these types of questions. I know he and Tom Stapleton have been studying redwood albinos.
Last edited by Mark Collins on Wed Jan 06, 2016 5:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Lucas
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Re: East Coast Albinos

Post by Lucas » Mon Jan 04, 2016 2:26 pm

We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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