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Help with species ID

Posted: Sat Dec 12, 2015 10:56 am
by tsharp
NTS:
I have not come up with a species ID for the twig/cone pictured below. Probably a planted specimen and found in a cemetery. Help! I am losing sleep.


Click on image to see its original size

Re: Help with species ID

Posted: Sun Dec 13, 2015 1:04 am
by mdvaden
tsharp wrote:NTS:
I have not come up with a species ID for the twig/cone pictured below. Probably a planted specimen and found in a cemetery. Help! I am losing sleep.
I'm not superb at ID of less commonly planted trees in our area, so I grabbed a book from the shelf TREES of NORTH AMERICA and EUROPE by Roger Phillips

Thumbing through, one photo that looked similar was:

Cunninghamia lanceolata / Chinese Fir ?

Here's a link to an only image.

https://facultystaff.richmond.edu/~jhay ... BG_04s.JPG

Your photo is a bit dark, but looks close to these.

Re: Help with species ID

Posted: Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:47 am
by earlecj
Yes, it's Cunninghamia, also called China fir (which is kind of a strange name, since China has a lot of firs, and this ain't one of them). A somewhat uncommon horticultural species, though they have been sold in Mexico in recent years as Christmas trees. Photos etc. at http://conifers.org/cu/Cunninghamia.php

Re: Help with species ID

Posted: Sun Dec 13, 2015 9:50 pm
by tsharp
Thank you Mario and Chris. I can get some sleep now. The tree was in a cemetery in the low country of South Carolina and about 60' tall.
Chris I did use your website but must have discounted the fir common name because I knew it could not be a true fir. There is a reason to use hyphens in common names. I think the web page that Chris runs (conifers.org)is the best internet source of everything conifer.

Re: Help with species ID

Posted: Mon Dec 21, 2015 8:28 am
by Erik Danielsen
There's a Cunninghamia about 12' tall at the botanical garden where I work, so after seeing your post I felt compelled to do a little searching. Take a look at the images on this page! http://www.botanyvn.com/cnt.asp?param=n ... =806&lg=en There is some debate over whether lanceolata and konishii are properly separate species, but either way, to meet an old-growth Cunninghamia would be a thrill. Here also: http://www.asianflora.com/Taxodiaceae/C ... nishii.htm