Question about tree diseases and pests ect

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John Harvey
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Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by John Harvey » Tue Aug 13, 2013 7:49 pm

Ok so it seems that just about all blights come from Asia. Our trees here have no resistance to the diseases or there are no natural predators to prey on the insects. Obviously the big ones; chestnut blight, Dutch elm disease, hemlock WA, EAB, are all from Asia and apparently no one saw them coming.
I guess my question is how will we know what's next? Is there some Asian insect or fungus that will kill our tulip poplars, our white pine, our cherry trees...or are the worst of the plagues already upon us? Is anyone out there tracking these things before they arrive?
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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edfrank
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Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by edfrank » Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:09 pm

Now now, it is far more important to keep out Mexicans looking for sub-minimum pay jobs that it is to inspect cargo and keep out invasive insects,diseases, drugs, and nuclear bombs.
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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John Harvey
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Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by John Harvey » Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:19 pm

Haha, yeah don't remember ever seeing a mob of illegal immigrants attacking a forest or trying to blow up anything for that matter.
I'm wondering if because the native species in Asia have such a resistance to these pests, that's why we cant see them coming. They are barely noticeable until the moment they hit our shores.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:41 pm

JohnnyDJersey wrote:Obviously the big ones; chestnut blight, Dutch elm disease, hemlock WA, EAB, are all from Asia and apparently no one saw them coming. I guess my question is how will we know what's next?
Don't forget about the Asian long-horned beetle:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_long-horned_beetle

Personally I don't see why it would stop now with the problems that are already present. To me there would almost have to be additional blights, invasive insects, etc. yet to come that threaten our trees and forests in North America during our lifetimes and beyond.

Modern globalization has 'shuffled the deck' and will continue to shuffle the deck ecologically speaking in both the plant and animal world on a global scale. It will take a long time for a new ecological equilibrium of some sort to emerge. Won't happen in our lifetimes. Or our grandchildren's lifetimes. And there will probably be a lot of extinctions before that happens, it seems to me. We are probably in the midst of the Earth's sixth major extinction event.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Rand
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Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by Rand » Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:54 pm

PAwildernessadvocate wrote:
Modern globalization has 'shuffled the deck' and will continue to shuffle the deck ecologically speaking in both the plant and animal world on a global scale. It will take a long time for a new ecological equilibrium of some sort to emerge.
I think Lee Freilich had a nice description of the same idea, 'We're homogenizing the world's ecosystems'

I wonder what nasty diseases we have to give back?

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Tue Aug 13, 2013 10:29 pm

Rand wrote: I wonder what nasty diseases we have to give back?
Well, I hope we never send the bronze birch borer to Europe, for one example.

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=4109
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Will Blozan
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Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by Will Blozan » Wed Aug 14, 2013 6:46 am

I had one client state that she thought HWA was a retaliation for the Hiroshima bombing...

bigbuglady
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Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by bigbuglady » Thu Aug 15, 2013 7:40 am

I worked (very briefly) in the Worcester office of the USDA-APHIS branch in charge of long-horned beetle eradication. The amount of in-fighting and ignorance was frightening. There were 2 "respected" MA foresters who were absolutely convinced that poison ivy was not native, yet could not present any documentation to support this. There were APHIS supervisors who were far more concerned with posturing and personal vendettas than anything else. There were crew members who had seen year-to-year repeat evidence of chestnut trees with flowering offspring, who did not want to share this information with anyone else.

One of the big issues with Asian interlopers is wood pallets. ALB is continuing to be found in wood pallets shipped from China. If legislation could be passed that bans wood pallets (what a great use for recycled plastic!), as in some countries, a lot of the serious wood pests would be curtailed.

On another note, I finally measured the 100-year-old maples in my backyard - the sugar is an unremarkable 111", the red is a respectable and healthy 139" dbh.

Kathryn

Joe

Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by Joe » Fri Aug 16, 2013 5:37 am

bigbuglady wrote:I worked (very briefly) in the Worcester office of the USDA-APHIS branch in charge of long-horned beetle eradication. The amount of in-fighting and ignorance was frightening. There were 2 "respected" MA foresters who were absolutely convinced that poison ivy was not native, yet could not present any documentation to support this. There were APHIS supervisors who were far more concerned with posturing and personal vendettas than anything else. There were crew members who had seen year-to-year repeat evidence of chestnut trees with flowering offspring, who did not want to share this information with anyone else.

One of the big issues with Asian interlopers is wood pallets. ALB is continuing to be found in wood pallets shipped from China. If legislation could be passed that bans wood pallets (what a great use for recycled plastic!), as in some countries, a lot of the serious wood pests would be curtailed.

On another note, I finally measured the 100-year-old maples in my backyard - the sugar is an unremarkable 111", the red is a respectable and healthy 139" dbh.

Kathryn
Interesting post--- as a forester in Mass. for 40 years, I'm not at all surprised about such bad behavior- I've seen it all and much more and I happen to still have numerous daggers in my back from such a*****s. The entire forestry world is loaded with stupidity but you'd never know it reading the "literature" they publish, which glorifies the "leadership". The propaganda is comparable to what was once produced in the Soviet Union.
Joe

Porter
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Re: Question about tree diseases and pests ect

Post by Porter » Fri Aug 16, 2013 1:28 pm

Well said PAwildernessadvocate. This is a topic i'm really interested in. Both personally and professionally.

I was talking with my brother-in-law a 3-4 years ago about his land. He lives in Central New York and his back yard is full of white ash. I told him "most of your trees are ash, except for the one by the fire pit, and they may be in trouble a few years from now when EAB arrives". Fast forward to 3 weeks ago I was back at his house for a wedding. Earlier that week EAB was discovered in his county. He says, "I guess I'm gonna lose my trees now, except for the one by the fire pit". I felt bad for the guy but i had to tell him. I said, "Well...you should start planting something else right now 'cause you're probably gonna lose that one too unless you protect it. It's an American elm and either DED or elm yellows is gonna get it".

I also worked briefly in Worcester on the ALB eradication effort. I was very impressed with most of the efforts of the federal, state, and local staff I encountered. Not all but most. Unfortunately ALB's favorite food is maple and well, it's New England so there's a boat load of 'em. Worcester's urban forest was the perfect storm of environmental conditions for ALB to explode due to unbelievably high quantities of maple. The street tree population was 80% maple (60% Norway maple)!! Check out a before & after view of one street here: http://massnrc.org/pests/blog/2009/02/a ... after.html.
Tim Porter

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