Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

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dbhguru
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Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

Post by dbhguru » Fri Mar 16, 2018 8:27 am

Hi Ents,

My good friend Ray Asselin has just officially released a film that he has been working on for months. The subject is the old growth forests of New England, although more accurately, of Massachusetts in terms of what we show. The video is on Youtube. Here is the link:

https://www.youtube.com/c/NewEnglandForests

As you probably expect, I play a significant role, but the film is, first and foremost, Ray's work. He has spent countless hours editing and has grown mightily as a film maker. We'll be partnering with Harvard Forest in showing the video to ecology classes and also groups in Cambridge.

In the film, we try to tell the story of New England's old growth in a straightforward way. We don't feature lots of background music, no animals fighting, or a deluge of human stories of settling the land as often accompany such films. You probably have to like trees and forests a lot to find this film interesting. So, where better to officially announce its release than here on the NTS BBS.

Please feel free to provide us feedback. We have other films in mind, and want to profit from our mistakes. We're pretty proud of the film and hope that it will resonate with people who see remnant natural forests as the treasures they are.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:06 am

Ray and Bob- A really interesting and informative film. I watched 20 minutes of it and enjoyed every bit. I will watch the whole thing later. Thanks for the hard work you guys put in to this it will be a hit. Larry

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Don
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Re: Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

Post by Don » Fri Mar 16, 2018 4:39 pm

What, no car chases ?!?!
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
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dbhguru
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Re: Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

Post by dbhguru » Fri Mar 16, 2018 6:19 pm

Don,

Not a one, but Ray does have some neat wildlife shots.

It is going to be interesting to see how far this film goes. It's time is right. We need a counter to the increasingly exploitive mindset toward our forests that has developed and gaining traction from the advocates of lots of early successional habitat (a justification for heavy cutting) and from the biomass crowd.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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KoutaR
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Re: Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

Post by KoutaR » Tue Mar 27, 2018 1:34 pm

I very much enjoyed watching the film. Keep filming!

The significance of old-growth was very well said at the very end of the film.

For the next edition, I wish descriptions of some individual old-growth sites.

Kouta

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ElijahW
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Re: Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

Post by ElijahW » Tue Mar 27, 2018 6:02 pm

Bob,

The film was excellent. From the narration to the photography to the interviews, I thought it was top-notch. Thanks to everyone who helped put it together and shared their knowledge on-screen.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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RayA
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Re: Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

Post by RayA » Tue Mar 27, 2018 6:30 pm

Thanks to all for the positive comments.

Don-- you'll be pleased to know that your question lit a fire... we're now working on another film in which we'll star. It will feature car and gurney chases through an old growth hickory forest, with big time special effects. Still working on the title, and looking for suggestions. Maybe something like "Old Mockernuts Running Wild"?

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

Post by Bart Bouricius » Wed Mar 28, 2018 7:43 pm

Ray,

That was an absolutely wonderful video, also very timely as pressure is mounting to open a huge pellet factory in Western Massachusetts. I appreciate the huge amounts of time and energy that is required to put together something like this. It was educational in an enjoyable way, such that wonderful footage was used to surround anything that could otherwise be dry. It is a fine balancing act to really say something important while keeping the viewers attention, and I think this has definitely been accomplished here.

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dbhguru
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Re: Announcing a film on New England's old growth forests

Post by dbhguru » Thu Mar 29, 2018 10:27 am

Ents,

Ditto to what Ray said. Obviously, the film was a labor of love and we hope it will win an ever widening audience.

On a related topic, I presented a lecture on measuring the carbon content in big trees at the Hitchcock Center for the Environment last evening. Ray and Jared attended and threw cabbages and tomatoes at me. Naw, just joking. The event was successful and may have opened a door to some high level contacts such as USFS retiree Dr. Richard Birdsey. His name is on many important carbon sequestration papers.

Basically, the opportunity is open to us to play an important role in measuring big, irregularly shaped trees for carbon content. Conventional approaches usually deal at the landscape level and basically stay there. Their methods and results don't project down to the individual tree level. We are the ones who have the methods for modeling individual trees. Is it time for us to push the envelope and make our contributions on a much wider scale?

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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