Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

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edfrank
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Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by edfrank » Mon Apr 08, 2013 4:40 pm

http://blogs.mcall.com/outdoors/2013/04 ... parks.html
#Hemlock woolly adelgid discovered in Western Pa. state parks

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Categories: Camping, Conservation, Current Affairs, Hiking, Nature, Outdoors, Pennsylvania

Posted at 01:45:45 PM on April 8, 2013
A non-native, invasive insect that attacks and kills Eastern hemlock trees has advanced westward across Pennsylvania to Clarion and Jefferson counties where infestations have been confirmed in two state parks.

“The hemlock woolly adelgid, a pervasive insect threat that has killed thousands of hemlocks across the state, has been detected in both Cook Forest State Park, Clarion County, and Clear Creek State Park in neighboring Jefferson County,” Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Richard Allan said. “This discovery is especially unsettling due to the signature hemlocks in both parks’ forests.”

Home to the most significant Eastern hemlock stand north of the Smoky Mountains, Cook Forest State Park is famous for its old-growth trees. Its “Forest Cathedral” of towering hemlock and white pine is a National Natural Landmar

For this reason, and in the face of the insect’s steady, northwestward spread, DCNR entomologists, foresters and park officials had ramped up early-detection efforts at the two parks. Attempts to delineate wooly adelgid infestation and chart feasible methods to combat its spread are now under way, Allan said.

“Park staff members have been regularly monitoring for the pest, and those surveys paid off with early detection that will allow for greater treatment options and better success,” Allan said. “Weather and snow cover have hampered attempts to gauge the insect’s spread, but we know there is infestation along the Clarion River, which flows through both Cook Forest and Clear Creek state parks.”

DCNR will be embarking on a two-pronged treatment effort that relies on selective application of insecticides and the release of predatory beetles.

“We have seen 74 sites and 11,000 trees treated in 21 counties in recent years through the continued cooperative effort among our bureaus of forestry, state parks and others,” Allan said.

DCNR is partnering with the USDA Forest Service, The Nature Conservancy and other interested organizations to develop an Eastern hemlock management plan for northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, its Bureau of Forestry is drafting a hemlock conservation plan for Pennsylvania.

The Cook Forest State Park infestation area is home to some of the Eastern United States’ tallest hemlocks, including the celebrated Seneca Hemlock, the area’s third-tallest at 147 feet and 4 feet in diameter. Although not yet known to be infested, other old-growth stands at Cook Forest, including the “Forest Cathedral,’’ are in danger due to the close proximity to this area.

The woolly adelgid is a fluid-feeding insect, easily detected by telltale egg sacs resembling cotton swabs that cling to undersides of hemlock branches. Introduced into the United States from Asia, it first was discovered in southeastern Pennsylvania in 1969 and steadily has been spreading westward. It now is found in 56 of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties.

Homeowners and other private property owners can learn more about the woolly adelgid, damage it causes, and efforts to combat it at http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us (click on “Forestry,” then “Insects and Disease” at upper left).

The Pennsylvania Parks & Forestry Foundation is accepting contributions to be used to combat the insect at Cook Forest and Clear Creek state parks. Donation checks, payable to Pennsylvania Parks & Forestry Foundation, or PPFF, can be sent to Cook Forest State Park, ATTN: HWA Fund, P.O. Box 120, Cooksburg, Pa., 16217.

For details on Cook Forest, Clear Creek and Pennsylvania’s other 118 state parks, call 1-888-PA-PARKS between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday; or visit http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us (select “Find a Park”).
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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edfrank
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Re: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by edfrank » Mon Apr 08, 2013 5:37 pm

Disheartening news today about the continued spread of the non-native invasive insect known as the hemlock wooly adelgid.

If you are a fan of our majestic ancient old-growth hemlock trees here in northwest Pennsylvania you may wish to take the time this spring/summer/fall to visit special wild places such as Cook Forest State Park immediately south of the Allegheny National Forest, the ANF's Tionesta Scenic and Research Natural Areas in McKean and Warren Counties, and the Hearts Content old-growth in southern Warren County.

Take lots of photos, or draw or paint if that is your aptitude. Commit what you see to your memory banks so you can tell your children and grandchildren. Just to be on the safe side. But let's hope for the best that the spread of the hemlock wooly adelgid will be arrested, and that these last remnant old-growth hemlocks can be saved!
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Will Blozan
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Re: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by Will Blozan » Mon Apr 08, 2013 6:03 pm

FU*#&(!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Mon Apr 08, 2013 6:44 pm

Well, we knew it was coming. The thing now is to find people willing to contribute time and money to save the old growth forests by treating them against the adelgids.

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by Matt Markworth » Mon Apr 08, 2013 6:48 pm

I agree. Go see them. I made the trip in 2010. If you like a quiet car-camping experience, then camp at Heart's Content (Campsite #19 is nice) and drive over to Tionesta and drive down to Cook Forest.
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mdavie
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Re: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by mdavie » Wed Apr 10, 2013 11:47 am

Will Blozan wrote:FU*#&(!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I concur.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Sun Aug 11, 2013 7:53 am

http://www.bradfordera.com/news/article ... f887a.html

The Bradford Era
Friday, August 9, 2013

Workshop to Save Hemlock Trees Held at Pitt-Bradford

Hemlock, the state tree which once comprised the majority of Pennsylvania's forests, may be on its way out of existence.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, a small aphid-like insect introduced from Japan, has devastated southern U.S. forests and has recently been found to have made its way to the Pennsylvania Wilds.

On Thursday, several agencies, organizations and stakeholders took part in the second workshop of the High Allegheny Hemlock Conservation Project held collaboratively by the U.S. Forest Service and the Pennsylvania Chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford....
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Will Blozan
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Re: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by Will Blozan » Sun Aug 11, 2013 9:39 am

If they think treatments are expensive just wait until the trees need to be cut for liability reasons!!!!!!!!!!!!

My experience with treatment projects in PA is that contractors are gouging and ripping off the State at the expense of the trees. Pricing I have seen is criminal- up to 20X what is being charged here in WNC.

Cook Forest has recently engaged me as a consultant on their HWA problem (also Clear Creek). I will be flying up end of this month for three days. The goal is to demonstrate the efficient and cost effective methods I use as well as share the 20/20 hindsight experience after 11 years battling this pest.

If all goes well the money will go to the trees and not the contractors pocket.

Will

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sjhalow
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Re: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by sjhalow » Sun Aug 11, 2013 7:07 pm

After an overnight stay at Cherry Springs State Park, to watch the Perseids, we drove through Colton Point State Park and found HWA at an overlook of the Pine Creek Gorge (PA Grand Canyon). We weren't even looking for it, so it's likely that the park is already extensively infested.

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Hemlock Wooly Adelgid found at Cook Forest SP, PA

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Sat Aug 17, 2013 10:16 am

I think I may have unfortunately identified an infested hemlock tree last night in a part of the Allegheny National Forest where HWA had not been known to be present.

The lighting wasn't great for these photos because it was late evening, but you should be able to make out the white cottony tufts if you look close.

What do you think? HWA?
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Last edited by PAwildernessadvocate on Sat Aug 17, 2013 5:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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