Algonquin PP Old Growth/Canoeing video

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Steve Galehouse
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Algonquin PP Old Growth/Canoeing video

Post by Steve Galehouse » Sat Dec 10, 2011 8:54 pm

This is a nice video, from a canoeing site I visit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztsc7qBYplk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztsc7qBYplk

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

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KoutaR
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Re: Algonquin PP Old Growth/Canoeing video

Post by KoutaR » Sun Dec 11, 2011 2:48 am

Steve,

It was a nice video, indeed; thanks for sharing! I hope I have possibility to go canoeing in Canadian wilderness in coming years.

Kouta

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dbhguru
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Re: Algonquin PP Old Growth/Canoeing video

Post by dbhguru » Sun Dec 11, 2011 9:01 am

NTS,

Very nice video. Monica and I were in Algonquin Provincial Park last summer and I measured the big pines in a protected stand. A pine 12 feet in girth and 120 feet in height pushes the limit of the species in that growing environment. But they are drop dead gorgeous. Greater size or height doesn't seem important. It is the ambience, the gestalt they create. That's enough.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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tomhoward
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Re: Algonquin PP Old Growth/Canoeing video

Post by tomhoward » Sun Dec 11, 2011 10:30 pm

NTS,

Really neat video. Those old growth White Pines are awesome!

Tom Howard

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PAwildernessadvocate
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Re: Algonquin PP Old Growth/Canoeing video

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Mon Dec 12, 2011 1:53 pm

Thank you for posting that, that's a nice video. After my sophomore year in high school I went on an extended canoe trip with a large church group in the Algonquin Park. I remember lots of moose, mosquitos, portages, and forest (and some leeches!). I don't remember if we encountered any old-growth on that trip, but on the other hand I may not have even been truly aware of the concept of "old-growth forest" at that age. I remember one girl fell and hurt her neck three or four days in to the trip, two guys paddled her back straight through for like 20 hours to get her to a hospital.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

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Steve Galehouse
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Re: Algonquin PP Old Growth/Canoeing video

Post by Steve Galehouse » Mon Dec 12, 2011 7:54 pm

NTS-

This video is especially appealing to me because a friend and I have a camp and cabin about due 45 miles west of Algonquin---in a Conservation Reserve with the same sort of terrain and vegetation. There are some patches of what I would consider old-growth in our area, especially some nice stands of hemlock, very dense and on level ground as opposed to ravine slopes, and red pine. There are a few white pine in the area that are likely original trees, but logging in the late 1800's and early 1900's removed any sizable stands. Much of the area shows different stages of regeneration, from mature woods to "barrens" caused by ground fires after logging.

Here is a slideshow video of our camp's area: http://vimeo.com/9834115

http://vimeo.com/9834115

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

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ElijahW
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Re: Algonquin PP Old Growth/Canoeing video

Post by ElijahW » Tue Dec 13, 2011 4:41 pm

Steve,

Great video. Thanks for sharing.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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