Seymour Woods State Nature Preserve

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Rand
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Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:25 pm

Seymour Woods State Nature Preserve

Post by Rand » Mon Feb 22, 2016 4:18 pm

Seymour Woods preservers a block of second growth forest along the low slopes above the Olentangy River between Delaware and the Columbus Metro Area. The elevation change between the river and the surrounding flat till plains is ~ 140'. The slope is fairly gradual except for the areas cut by steep ravines. US Rte 23 connects the two urban areas and has seen rather intense development over the last 20 years or so. So while the Woods is a fairly average second growth consisting of mainly red oak, white oak, and hickory the preserve at least prevents the whole area from going up in expensive housing:
North is to the top left
North is to the top left
This pretty young Red Oak is about the best the place has to offer:
8' 9.5" x 107' Red Oak
8' 9.5" x 107' Red Oak
However, the preserve does have fairly old groves of planted Red, Scots, and White pine planted adjacent to each other, which makes for a nice curiosity in this part of the state (The native forest is all hardwoods). The bedrock is shale (it transitions to limestone just a few dozen miles to the west) so the white pines have done fairly well, with the general height of pines ~ 115'-120' and 6'-7' cbh. A few tuliptrees of identical size to the pines are sprinkled in the grove, along with a few decidedly smaller spruces (Norway I think).
_MG_9132.jpg
_MG_9134_5_merged.JPG
The other two pine species...not so much. Judging by the abundant fallen pine trunks on the forest floor, they used to cover the same area as the white pine, but only a handful remain. The Scots Pines in particular looked to be in delicate health, and may be all gone in the next 5-10 years
4' 11" x 85.5' scots pine
4' 11" x 85.5' scots pine
4' 11" x 85.5' scots pine crown detail
4' 11" x 85.5' scots pine crown detail
Red Pines
Red Pines
Anyway, I thought it would make for an interesting point of comparison to the pines reported for the cornel plantation:

http://ents-bbs-org.nativetreesociety.o ... 6de#p35988
seymour ss.png

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Jess Riddle
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Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 10:59 am

Re: Seymour Woods State Nature Preserve

Post by Jess Riddle » Mon Feb 22, 2016 10:06 pm

Rand,

I think it's important to have some measurements from "ordinary" sites. They help us appreciate how extraordinary the other sites are and help us learn what attributes make a site exceptionally productive.

Jess

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ElijahW
Posts: 841
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

Re: Seymour Woods State Nature Preserve

Post by ElijahW » Mon Feb 22, 2016 10:29 pm

Rand,

Ninety feet would be very good for a Scots pine around here. In fact, the only ones I've seen taller are at Cornell and Beaver Lake in Baldwinsville, NY. I believe those small sites are outliers. Scots pine may owe its poor reputation to less than satisfactory seed sources, perhaps suffering the same fate as what Gaines McMartin has posited for Norway Spruce. Scots pine in Central NY is generally a very ugly tree, and has a high mortality rate. In my opinion, Jack pine should have been used in its place, but of course I wasn't around to do any consulting in the 30s, when most of these plantations were established.

Red pine commonly reaches 90-100' in plantations here, but 110' seems very rare, regardless of age. I like the look of Red pine, and love to walk through pure stands of it, but it seems to have a pretty low ceiling, especially compared to White pine.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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