Little Darby Creek: Requiem for the Ash

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Rand
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Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:25 pm

Little Darby Creek: Requiem for the Ash

Post by Rand » Thu Apr 30, 2015 8:44 pm

Nestled on the upland along Little Darby creek there is a nice little woodlot of 4-5 acres, which contains some fairly nice second growth trees. The land is very gently rolling and sloping toward the creek, with only ~ 5' of relief across the site, but it is enough to subtly affect the species composition. The mesic woods closer to the creek are dominated by large green ashes, with a few blue ashes mixed in. Less prominent were hackberries, walnuts, and scattering of slippery elms, both dead and alive. The dominant trees on the drier portions transitioned to red and white oaks, with a few red and shagbark hickories mixed in. Medium sized sugar maples filled in the balance of the mature trees in between the two extremes.

The bad news is of course the emerald ash borer. It hit the suburbs of Columbus hard ~5 years ago and has been steadily working its way across the countryside ever since. Nearly all the trees showed severe crown dieback, and I expect all of them to be dead in the next 2-3 years. So with the passing of the chestnut in mind, I took pictures for posterity:
10' 7" x 81' Green Ash (The Bee Tree)
10' 7" x 81' Green Ash (The Bee Tree)
10' 6" x 103' Green Ash
10' 6" x 103' Green Ash
8' 10" x 112' Green Ash
8' 10" x 112' Green Ash
8' 2.5" x 93' Blue Ash
8' 2.5" x 93' Blue Ash

A little more hopeful note, I dd find an american elm, that has escape DED long enough to develop hollows:
14' 8" x 81' American Elm
14' 8" x 81' American Elm
One of the ash trees had hive of wild bees, in a hollow ~8' in the air. Getting the CBH was a wee bit nerve wracking with all those bees swarming overhead, but fortunately they left me alone.
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little darby.png

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