Hocking Hills Romp

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Matt Markworth » Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:48 pm

Rand,

Thanks again for setting this up. I'm looking forward to another hike there if we can get a group together.

Good to know a lot of people are looking after this forest, and maybe even some other unknown creatures keeping a watchful eye....here's a photo from the day....
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eye.jpg
Matt

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Rand
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Rand » Mon Apr 20, 2015 9:10 pm

_MG_8781.jpg
Weathered sandstone. There are a few areas like this at Old Man's Cave, but they are less elaborated and visibly worn down from crowds of people handling them.
_MG_8776.jpg
~10'x120' Red Oak
~10'x120' Red Oak
Old chestnut snag. One of the biggest I've seen.
_MG_8790.jpg

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George Fieo
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by George Fieo » Fri Apr 24, 2015 10:50 pm

dbhguru wrote:Matt,

My guess is that Georgia will make the 150 Club without any trouble, but I doubt Virginia will. Nor do
I think Alabama can make it. Based on what Larry Tucei has found, Missippi won't make it. Florida? No way. Kentucky is a possibility. There is no state in the Northeast that can do it unless it is Pennsylvania. I would guess that PA is around 146 or 147. Ohio is part of a pretty exclusive club.

Bob
Bob and Matt,

Pennsylvania should have a Rucker Index around 151'. I'll have to contact Dale and Steve H to get current numbers for several species.

George

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Matt Markworth » Sat Apr 25, 2015 12:30 pm

George,

Cool, thanks. Good to know PA is solidly in the 150'+ range for the Rucker Height Index. The 184+' white pine definitely gives it a boost. Looking at the Trees database and the PA Big Tree website, the tuliptree, ashes, and hickories help out quite a bit as well. Ohio gets a boost from the 171' tuliptree, the 155' hemlock, the 154' sycamore and the hickories helping out too.

Rand,

Here are a few more photos of the chestnut snag. That was definitely the highlight of the day for me, along with the tall white pine.
chesnut snag -1.JPG
chestnut snag - 2.JPG
chestnut snag - 3.JPG
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Jess Riddle
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Jess Riddle » Sun May 03, 2015 7:54 pm

Bob, Matt;

Yes, the GA Rucker Index easily clears 150'. Here's the best list I can put together.
GA Rucker.JPG
GA Rucker.JPG (35.63 KiB) Viewed 1262 times
I think Arkansas should be added to the list of potential states. I'm sure once upon a time the state had the trees to top 150' without any trouble, and may still have them. I haven't calculated a Rucker for AR, but I think it currently stands in the mid to upper 140's.

Jess

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sradivoy
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by sradivoy » Thu Sep 03, 2015 1:58 pm

Jess Riddle wrote:Bob, Matt;

Yes, the GA Rucker Index easily clears 150'. Here's the best list I can put together.
GA Rucker.JPG
I think Arkansas should be added to the list of potential states. I'm sure once upon a time the state had the trees to top 150' without any trouble, and may still have them. I haven't calculated a Rucker for AR, but I think it currently stands in the mid to upper 140's.

Jess

I'm surprised that there are no tall sycamores that made the top ten.

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sradivoy
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by sradivoy » Thu Nov 26, 2015 11:44 pm

Matt Markworth wrote:
sradivoy wrote:What's the CBH of that tall white pine? I wonder how young this fast growing pubescent tree is. It doesn't look like an original planting, whenever that occured. Is there a list of the tallest trees in the state relative to their diameters?
The CBH is 7'1" for the 155.7' white pine. Others close by are 7'9" x 154.8' and 9'9" x 149.7'. I don't know the history of the planting, but I think Rand and I were discussing it and I think the possibility of the 1920's came up.

I'm not aware of a list like that, but the Trees Database would probably be the closest match.

Matt

Went to this white pine plantation by Queer creek the other day. I only measured one tree at 150' x 7' CBH. It might be the same tree and I missed the top, or perhaps another tree entirely. Another tall tree was directly behind it up slope.
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Rand
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Rand » Fri Nov 27, 2015 7:36 am

You have to go uphill, and ~ 50 yards further upstream from there to get the tallest trees we found. More or less the NE corner of the grove.

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sradivoy
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by sradivoy » Fri Nov 27, 2015 12:16 pm

Rand wrote:You have to go uphill, and ~ 50 yards further upstream from there to get the tallest trees we found. More or less the NE corner of the grove.
I remember seeing a thick one up by the bend of the road. I must have walked right under the tall tree without even realizing it.

Its been a good twenty five years since I've been to the Hocking Hills region. I was impressed by the large and tall hemlocks near old man's cave. They're getting a lot of foot traffic unfortunately. I like the hemlock with the multi reiterated trunk near the visitor center. I think it has a lot of character.

I saw a tall 144' hemlock by the Rockhouse area. I'm not sure about its health. It seemed a bit discolored, but it might be the way the sun was shining at it. I wanted to visit the tall 155' hemlock at Rose Hollow but ran out of time. I wanted to get on the interstate before dark and not be driving on the winding back roads at night. The hemlocks are clearly the largest and tallest in the state and are just as impressive as the ones I've seen in western PA.
Last edited by sradivoy on Fri Nov 27, 2015 5:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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