Hocking Hills Romp

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Rand
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Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Rand » Sun Apr 12, 2015 3:20 pm

On April 11, Mark M. & I visited the south bank of lower Queer creek to check out some tall LIDAR hits. The lower reaches were rolling terrain covered in a mixed oak forest. In this area we were able to find one tall bitternut hickory (129' IIRC) that will add nicely to the rucker index. Gradually the terrain roughened and we crossed several deep ravines that contained soaring, large-crowned second growth tuliptrees. Despite the promising LIDAR hits in the 160' range, they turned out to be in the ~130'-140', and the tall hits caused by them growing over narrow ravines. Moving upstream, the cliffs and hollows for which the region is known soon made their presence felt. While quite pretty, and dominated by impressive looking hemlocks in the 130'-140' range, once again we didn't find any superlatives.
8802_8803_merge.JPG
8811_13_merged.JPG
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On the return trip we saw this upturned red oak. The underside of the root mass was eerily smooth, as if the tree was growing on a sidewalk.
_MG_8814 (1).jpg
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The highlight of the visit was a return to the white pine plantation where I found a 151' tree in 2008:

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... ockets.htm

Unfortunately, the area of grove pictured experience a lot of mortality in the last 5 years or so, and all the best trees died in that area. After some determined searching and careful measuring, we turned up a 155.7' tree further upslope. Defying the usual rule of thumb that the tallest tree in a group is usually the largest diameter one, this tree is a skinny specimen surrounded on all sides by larger diameter trees, with far more dominant looking crowns, nearly 150' tall.
8796-8797_merged.JPG
The tree is the skinny tree in the center of the frame, clear in the background. It's height puts it within striking distance of the 156' White Pine found in Mohican in 2011:

http://ents-bbs-org.nativetreesociety.o ... 5276#p8407

However, if you zoom in to it's top, you can see the tree is still growing upward rapidly. Assuming that whatever killed the trees further downslope doesn't get it, it should overtake the Mohican tree in just a couple more years.
Detail of the tree's top
Detail of the tree's top

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dbhguru
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by dbhguru » Sun Apr 12, 2015 4:51 pm

Rand,

What is Ohio's overall RI now? Will you be at Fort Hill on the 19th for the dedication?

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Matt Markworth » Mon Apr 13, 2015 6:22 pm

Rand,

Thanks for the great day out in the woods. The Hocking Hills "Romp" made for a nice side trip after the guided hike over at Crane.

Bob,

Here's an updated RHI10 for Ohio:

tuliptree - 171' (Sand Run)
eastern white pine - 156.2' (Clearfork Gorge)
eastern hemlock - 155.4' (Hocking Hills)
American sycamore - 154.5' (Everett Woods)
bitternut hickory - 151.9' (California Woods)
northern red oak - 146' (two trees at 146' - Sand Run and Hocking Hills)
eastern cottonwood - 143.4' (Sand Run)
pignut hickory - 143.4' (Fort Hill)
black cherry - 143.1' (California Woods)
white oak - 140.5' (Fort Hill)

RHI10 - 150.5'

All,

Besides NC, SC, TN, OH, and WV, are there other states in the East with an RHI10 reaching 150'+? Where does GA's Rucker currently stand?


Also, here are a few more photos from Hocking Hills:
155.7' white pine
155.7' white pine
155.7' white pine
155.7' white pine
red oak root mass
red oak root mass
red oak root mass
red oak root mass
hemlock jungle gym
hemlock jungle gym
hemlock jungle gym root mass
hemlock jungle gym root mass
Matt

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Rand
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Rand » Mon Apr 13, 2015 7:45 pm

Matt Markworth wrote:Rand,

Thanks for the great day out in the woods. The Hocking Hills "Romp" ....

Matt
It seemed the best term for the steep ravines and creeks we had to cross going both ways.

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dbhguru
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by dbhguru » Mon Apr 13, 2015 8:08 pm

Matt,

My guess is that Georgia will make the 150 Club without any trouble, but I doubt Virginia will. Nor do
I think Alabama can make it. Based on what Larry Tucei has found, Missippi won't make it. Florida? No way. Kentucky is a possibility. There is no state in the Northeast that can do it unless it is Pennsylvania. I would guess that PA is around 146 or 147. Ohio is part of a pretty exclusive club.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Matt Markworth » Mon Apr 13, 2015 8:51 pm

Bob,

Maybe with a few more finds in PA and a broad survey of Eastern KY we can end up with a 150' RHI10 Club that looks like the following. I wonder how close VA is. It sure would make for a more appealing map if that piece of the puzzle was included.
150' state RHI10 possibility.JPG
150' state RHI10 possibility.JPG (18.93 KiB) Viewed 1602 times
Matt

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sradivoy
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by sradivoy » Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:32 pm

What's the CBH of that tall white pine? I wonder how young this fast growing pubescent tree is. It doesn't look like an original planting, whenever that occured. Is there a list of the tallest trees in the state relative to their diameters?

Looking forward to the Crane Hollow report btw.

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Larry Tucei » Tue Apr 14, 2015 4:22 pm

Randy- Looks like you guys had a good day in the Forest. White Pine over 150' is rare! The overturned Oak reminds me of the giant overturned Cherrybark at Congaree- At the time that was the largest downed tree that I have ever seen- it was a monster! Larry

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Rand
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Rand » Tue Apr 14, 2015 5:49 pm

Larry Tucei wrote:Randy- Looks like you guys had a good day in the Forest. White Pine over 150' is rare! The overturned Oak reminds me of the giant overturned Cherrybark at Congaree- At the time that was the largest downed tree that I have ever seen- it was a monster! Larry
The root mass looks huge, but surprisingly the oak wasn't all that large. It was only 2' dbh or so. The bedrock was only a foot or so below the ground and very smooth, so the whole thing just sorta peeled up like a sticker.

Other places in Ohio where I've seen trees uproot like this, there are usually big chunks of rock torn up with the roots, but the massive sandstone in this location remained unblemished.

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Romp

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Apr 14, 2015 8:08 pm

sradivoy wrote:What's the CBH of that tall white pine? I wonder how young this fast growing pubescent tree is. It doesn't look like an original planting, whenever that occured. Is there a list of the tallest trees in the state relative to their diameters?
The CBH is 7'1" for the 155.7' white pine. Others close by are 7'9" x 154.8' and 9'9" x 149.7'. I don't know the history of the planting, but I think Rand and I were discussing it and I think the possibility of the 1920's came up.

I'm not aware of a list like that, but the Trees Database would probably be the closest match.

Matt

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