Hocking Hills Region

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sradivoy
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by sradivoy » Tue Feb 10, 2015 9:18 am

I'm curious about about that big hemlock mentioned from Tom's 2004 post: "140.1' BIG tree, but across the creek". Anyone ever get a circumference measurement for that tree?

Great finds! You're mopping up the joint. Any signs of HWA?

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Feb 10, 2015 10:03 am

sradivoy wrote:I'm curious about about that big hemlock mentioned from Tom's 2004 post: "140.1' BIG tree, but across the creek". Anyone ever get a circumference measurement for that tree?

Great finds! You're mopping up the joint. Any signs of HWA?
Thanks. It was kind of dark when I walked the trail through there so I didn't get a good look at it, but there were definitely big hemlocks. I'll be back there and will check it out. Despite all the people, Old Man's Cave and Ash Cave are a must see for any one in or passing through the area.

With all the deep hollows, there is a good chance that the 155.4' hemlock can be surpassed. Nope, no sign of HWA.

Matt

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sradivoy
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by sradivoy » Tue Feb 10, 2015 10:44 am

What did I tell ya recently? Not to toot my own horn.

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f ... 827#p31638

You probably knew it deep inside. You were either being very modest and/or highly secretive.

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Feb 10, 2015 11:03 am

sradivoy wrote:What did I tell ya recently? Not to toot my own horn.

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f ... 827#p31638

You probably knew it deep inside. You were either being very modest and/or highly secretive.
Under promise, over deliver:) Just kidding. I actually have been surprised.

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sradivoy
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by sradivoy » Tue Feb 10, 2015 11:58 am

To find a 160 plus tree other than a tulip would really be something in Ohio. I'm rooting for ya!

There's something dark and mysterious, and yes magical, about a hemlock forest. I think it has something to do with the immediate micro-climate it seems to generate. The temperature seems to drop 10 degrees when entering a hemlock forest. Now that's magic! For me, hemlocks are the "warlocks" of the ancient, primeval forest.

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sradivoy
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by sradivoy » Wed Feb 11, 2015 10:23 am

Matt Markworth wrote:
dbhguru wrote:Matt,

That place is freakin amazing. It has been sooo under appreciated by those of us outside Ohio. I look forward to visiting it in April. What's the Rucker now?

Bob
Bob,

If the planted white pine is included the Rucker 10 is currently at 139.7'. The Rucker 10 at California Woods stands at 140.2', so I would expect the Hocking Hills Region to surpass California Woods with just 1 or 2 more finds. I think it's reasonable to think that the bottom 4 trees can be replaced with taller trees of the same or different species, so there's quite a bit of room for the Rucker 10 to go higher.

tuliptree: 9'11" x 170'
eastern hemlock: 155.4'
American sycamore: 8'11" x 151'
eastern white pine: 8'6" x 151'
northern red oak: 10'2" x 146'

RHI5: 154.6'

American beech: 8'2" x 135.8'
American basswood: 10'10.5" x 123.1'
sugar maple: 7'10" x 122.6'
red maple: 8'8.5" x 121.6'
black cherry: 5'6" x 120.8'

RHI10: 139.7'


Matt
Matt,

I think you can bump the Rucker Index simply by updating some of the tree heights that haven't been measured in awhile. You might be able to eek out a foot or so from that 151' white pine and sycamore, for instance.

Stefan

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Jess Riddle
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Jess Riddle » Sat Feb 21, 2015 11:20 pm

Matt,

It's really nice to have all the posts gathered from across the years for important sites like this. It really helps understand just how impressive the site is. I'm looking forward to seeing what you and Rand find next.

Jess

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Rand
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Rand » Mon Apr 13, 2015 8:29 pm

sradivoy wrote:I'm curious about about that big hemlock mentioned from Tom's 2004 post: "140.1' BIG tree, but across the creek". Anyone ever get a circumference measurement for that tree?
The best candidate for this description that I found was 11.0' x 144'. It stands out by itself, and it's slow taper bole is clear of branches for a taller height than most trees around it. It's size advantage over the rest of the trees growing around the lower falls, turned out to be a bit of an optical illusion.

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Matt Markworth » Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:34 pm

All,

Here's a nice American beech and black birch that I measured on the way back from PA. These are located in a nice beech/hemlock grove in Hocking Hills State Park.

American beech: 9'3" x 129'
black birch: 5'4" x 105.7'
129' beech
129' beech
129' beech
129' beech
105.7' black birch
105.7' black birch
hemlocks
hemlocks
Matt

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sradivoy
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by sradivoy » Thu Aug 20, 2015 4:49 pm

Matt Markworth wrote:A couple trees I missed from Rand's post in 2011:
7) Cedar Falls. Tourist trap. Very similar looking to Lower falls. The exceptional basswood (10' 10.5" x 123') is clearly visible from the trail a short distance down the trail to Old Man's Cave.

8) One higher streamside bench hosts by far the largest tree in the park. A enormous spreading Red Oak 13' x 131' tall.

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=111&t=1928
Rand, NTS,

If we can find a couple more tall trees then the Hocking Hills region would likely have the tallest Rucker 10 in Ohio. Some possibilities are pignut hickory, red hickory, bitternut hickory, shagbark hickory, white ash, black walnut, white oak, chestnut oak, or maybe a taller black cherry or red maple.

Matt
Since this is a "regional" Rutger Index that includes multiple sites and/or political boundaries it shouldn't be compared to small single parks like California Woods or Sand Run, but rather to other regions of similar size such as the Cuyahoga Valley composite which has a RI 10 of 142'. I believe the Hocking hills region currently has the highest regional Rutger 5 index in the state if I'm not mistaken.
Last edited by sradivoy on Thu Aug 20, 2015 5:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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