Hocking Hills Region

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Matt Markworth
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Hocking Hills Region

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Feb 03, 2015 8:48 am

NTS,

For the sake of organization and to better understand the scope of the region, I thought it would be nice to reference the previous Hocking Hills posts in one place along with some additional information.

General map of the area:
500px-Hocking_hills_area.jpg
A 1975 report on the geology of the region by Michael C. Hansen: http://geosurvey.ohiodnr.gov/portals/ge ... s/GB_4.pdf

Creative Commons photos with scenes from the region:
1937_at_Ash_Cave.jpg
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File: ... h_Cave.jpg
HockingHillsAshCave.jpg
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File: ... shCave.jpg
HockingHillsCedarFalls.jpg
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File: ... rFalls.jpg
Oldmanscave5.jpg
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Oldmanscave5.jpg
Conkles_Hollow.jpg
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File: ... Hollow.jpg

Tom's post from 2004:
Hemlock, all old growth:
139.8' x 7' 0" middle aged, with lower branch stubs
137.7' across the creek and uphill
140.1' BIG tree, but across the creek
143.7' x 9' 7" sticks out, probably the reported 160-footer
144.7' x 12' 0" virtually no taper, HUGE mass of wood!

Young to middle-aged tulips abound, some are coppiced stump sprouts.
139.4' x 6' 1" & 5' 10" (coppice)
140.2' x 8' 6" nice tree, but doesn't look much over 100 years
123.6' gnarled defect-ridden old timer left behind
133.3'
131.4'

American sycamore, some shot from below due to tough location:
1) 147.1' x 7' 0"
2) 139.2' x 7' 11"
3) 145.0' x 7' 8"
4) 142.0' x 9' 0"
5) 146.5' x 7' 8"
AND...
6) 151.0' x 8' 11" yeah baby!!!

Next... American beech, likely left unharvested due to its relatively poor
timber value.
1) 122.5' x 7' 7"
2) 125.7' x 5' 9"
3) 120.3' x 6' 8"
4) 123.8' x unmeasured but ~7'
5) 128.1' x 8' 10" x ~80' crown

Others...
1) sugar maple 116.6' x 6' 7" (few maples in gorge)
2) tulip tree 140.5' x 5' 3" (others of similar height last fall)
3) red oaks 110.5 x 6' 8", 116.6 x 9' 9" (OG tree), 123.5 x 6' 8"
4) black cherry 120.8' x 5' 6"
5) black birch 101.5' (from below)
6) Black tupelo 101.1' x 5' 6"
7) Red maple 109.0' x 6' 5" (larger of 2 stems)
8) yellow birch 88.2' x 7' 7" (gnarly old tree)

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... lls_sp.htm
Rand's post from 2008:
White Pine 9’ 1.0” 147.1'
White Pine 7’ 9.0” 148.7’
White Pine 8’ 4.0” 150.4’
White Pine 6’ 3.0” 148.2”
White Pine 8’ 3.0” 147.9’
White Pine 8’ 6.0” 151.0’
White Pine 8’ 6.0” 149.4’

http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldt ... ockets.htm
Rand's post from 2011:
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http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=111&t=1928
Rand's post from 2014:
The tallest tulip went from 9' 1" x 154' to 9' 4.5" x 157'
The tallest hemlock went from 149.8' to 153.5'
A well positioned tulip on a streamside bench downhill from the tall hemlock went from 145.7 to 150'

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=111&t=6118
My post from 2015:
9'3" x 165.5' tuliptree
10'2" x 146' northern red oak
hemlocks at 137', 133', and 9'10" x 126.5'

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=111&t=6827
My post from 2015:
9'11" x 170' tuliptree
163' tuliptree
143.5' sycamore

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=111&t=6879
Matt

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Feb 03, 2015 2:16 pm

A couple trees I missed from Rand's post in 2011:
7) Cedar Falls. Tourist trap. Very similar looking to Lower falls. The exceptional basswood (10' 10.5" x 123') is clearly visible from the trail a short distance down the trail to Old Man's Cave.

8) One higher streamside bench hosts by far the largest tree in the park. A enormous spreading Red Oak 13' x 131' tall.

http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=111&t=1928
Rand, NTS,

If we can find a couple more tall trees then the Hocking Hills region would likely have the tallest Rucker 10 in Ohio. Some possibilities are pignut hickory, red hickory, bitternut hickory, shagbark hickory, white ash, black walnut, white oak, chestnut oak, or maybe a taller black cherry or red maple.

Matt

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Larry Tucei » Wed Feb 04, 2015 8:45 am

Matt-- Wow that is a beautiful looking place and I love the Cliff and Cave. Lots of tall trees. Nice photos a really cool posting. Larry

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Matt Markworth » Sat Feb 07, 2015 7:38 pm

All,

I had the pleasure of oohing and ahhing at the hemlocks at Hocking Hills today. Compared to other parts of Ohio, apparently Hocking County has a higher concentration of hemlocks as evidenced by the following range map: http://www.ohio.edu/people/dyer/hemlock/OH_Hemlock.JPG

It was too slick to get CBH on the two tallest trees, although I was able to establish midslope at each tree.

Hemlocks
155.4' - Rose Hollow - New Ohio Height Record
152.5' - Rose Hollow - skinnier than the others, ~2.5 dbh
11'4" x 151.5' - South of Old Man's Cave, in "The Gulf"
9'10" x 142.5' - South of Old Man's Cave, in "The Gulf"
148.5' - Ash Cave
146' - Ash Cave
144.5' - Ash Cave

Topographic Map: http://www.mytopo.com/maps/?lat=39.4270 ... 53889&z=15 "The Gulf" and Rose Hollow should be viewable, with Ash Cave farther to the south.
Hemlocks - Ash Cave
Hemlocks - Ash Cave
Ash Cave
Ash Cave
Bottom of 151.5' hemlock
Bottom of 151.5' hemlock
Video of 151.5' hemlock:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtOsg_jRzPw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtOsg_jRzPw

Video of Rose Hollow:

The skinny tree that leans to the right is the 152.5' tree. The 155.4' tree is behind it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SGiZ5N1b9Y
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SGiZ5N1b9Y

Matt

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dbhguru
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by dbhguru » Sat Feb 07, 2015 9:45 pm

Matt,

That place is freakin amazing. It has been sooo under appreciated by those of us outside Ohio. I look forward to visiting it in April. What's the Rucker now?

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Feb 08, 2015 8:08 am

dbhguru wrote:Matt,

That place is freakin amazing. It has been sooo under appreciated by those of us outside Ohio. I look forward to visiting it in April. What's the Rucker now?

Bob
Bob,

If the planted white pine is included the Rucker 10 is currently at 139.7'. The Rucker 10 at California Woods stands at 140.2', so I would expect the Hocking Hills Region to surpass California Woods with just 1 or 2 more finds. I think it's reasonable to think that the bottom 4 trees can be replaced with taller trees of the same or different species, so there's quite a bit of room for the Rucker 10 to go higher.

tuliptree: 9'11" x 170'
eastern hemlock: 155.4'
American sycamore: 8'11" x 151'
eastern white pine: 8'6" x 151'
northern red oak: 10'2" x 146'

RHI5: 154.6'

American beech: 8'2" x 135.8'
American basswood: 10'10.5" x 123.1'
sugar maple: 7'10" x 122.6'
red maple: 8'8.5" x 121.6'
black cherry: 5'6" x 120.8'

RHI10: 139.7'


Matt

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Rand
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Rand » Sun Feb 08, 2015 1:42 pm

I hate to say this, but to get a true measure of the Region we really need to get in Crane Hollow. I went through the Lidar tiles for the entire site and created this map when I applied for a permit to get on the site to measure - which they rejected without any clear explanation:
crane.jpg
Pay particular attention to the top right hand quadrant (Hood hollow). Yeah, that looks like a 160'+ hemlock to me too.

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Feb 08, 2015 3:12 pm

Rand,

Sweet map. It's good to know I wasn't the only one foiled by the Conkle's Hollow LiDAR void.

I noticed that Crane Hollow does occasional nature hikes open to the public. Maybe one or both of us could try to get signed up for the next one, and either check out some of these LiDAR hits during the hike or start the conversation for a follow-up visit.

I agree there is a lot of potential in there. The 165.5' tuliptree and the 146' northern red oak are in the Crane Hollow drainage. They are situated within Hocking Hills State Forest and are just a stone's throw from the property boundary.

Matt

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Rand
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Rand » Sun Feb 08, 2015 3:47 pm

Mark,

I made that map about this time last year. I was hoping to go down there and camp and then hit all the hot spots over a couple of days. Frankly their rejection really tweaked me to the point of contemplating what they say about begging for forgiveness. I typed the application up and drew cross sectional pictures of how Lidar can be fooled in steep terrain and after all that effort they just sorta blew me off. Frankly I think they assumed I would be scared off with having to write an application.

On the upside they did offer to have their property manager lead a group for us on a hike. Maybe we could get a group together for this spring?

Anyway, I didn't think it was worth it nibbling around the edges, considering everything else that is there. 170' says I was very wrong.

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Hocking Hills Region

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Feb 08, 2015 6:03 pm

Rand wrote:On the upside they did offer to have their property manager lead a group for us on a hike. Maybe we could get a group together for this spring?
Cool, I would definitely be up for that. Most weekends are good, and if they preferred a weekday then maybe the week after the April 16th-17th Cook Forest event would be good.

Matt

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