Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

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Matt Markworth
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Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by Matt Markworth » Sat Jan 03, 2015 9:21 pm

All,

Residing within Hocking Hills State Forest, this 9'3" x 165.5' tuliptree becomes what I think is the tallest known tree in the southern half of Ohio. It's located near the bottom of a ravine and gets some wind protection from surrounding sandstone cliffs. I've noticed that tuliptrees in Ohio thrive in sandy soils. This was my first visit to this state forest and this tree was in the first ravine that I visited, so there's a good chance that there is a taller tree in this 9,000 acre state forest.

The hemlocks create a magical feel and were much denser than other places I've visited. The cliffs, boulders, recess caves and waterfalls add to the magical quality. My photos don't show a lot of these other features, but I'll definitely be back there to measure more trees and to take more photos.
165.5' tuliptree base
165.5' tuliptree base
165.5' tuliptree
165.5' tuliptree
165.5' tuliptree
165.5' tuliptree
Looking down the ravine that the tuliptree is in
Looking down the ravine that the tuliptree is in
A nearby waterfall (not the same ravine)
A nearby waterfall (not the same ravine)
Hemlock on log
Hemlock on log
Matt

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sradivoy
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Re: Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by sradivoy » Sun Jan 04, 2015 6:16 am

Looks like you hit the jackpot! I'm assuming that you didn't use lidar in locating this tree. If that's the case the chances are very good in finding a taller tree.The odds would certainly be in your favor.

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John Harvey
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Re: Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by John Harvey » Sun Jan 04, 2015 7:47 am

This trees location looks like the classic setting for a lot of the taller individual TP trees I've found in NJ and a couple in DE. I've always assumed that the tree, in an effort to compete for light, had to grow taller to achieve the same canopy height as the forest around it because of its starting point in the ravine.
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John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Jan 04, 2015 9:04 am

sradivoy wrote:Looks like you hit the jackpot! I'm assuming that you didn't use lidar in locating this tree. If that's the case the chances are very good in finding a taller tree.The odds would certainly be in your favor.
I've only pulled a couple LiDAR tiles for the site and didn't notice this tree. If there was a way to eliminate false hits (because of trees hanging over cliffs), then analysis of the tiles would be much faster! Fortunately, the false hits are pretty easy to spot in the LiDAR Data Viewer by looking at the land surface below the tall hit.

Matt

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sradivoy
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Re: Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by sradivoy » Sun Jan 04, 2015 2:37 pm

There's probably 170+ tulips along with 160+ hemlocks in there somewhere. Good luck in your search!

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by Matt Markworth » Sun Jan 04, 2015 3:19 pm

sradivoy wrote:There's probably 170+ tulips along with 160+ hemlocks in there somewhere. Good luck in your search!
It's possible, but I doubt they'll be quite that tall. Maybe another Tuliptree in the mid-160's and hemlocks maxing out in the high 140's.

Matt

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Jess Riddle
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Re: Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by Jess Riddle » Sun Jan 04, 2015 4:13 pm

Matt,

Congratulations! That tuliptree seems like quite a significant find, and reinforces what an exceptional site Hocking Hills is.

GIS software can help with the canopy height vs. tree height issues. One simple approach is to produce a layer of slopes from the lidar ground surface layer, then filter out all the high hits that are on slopes above a certain threshold. There's a pretty steep learning curve with GIS software, but QGIS is free.

Jess

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by Larry Tucei » Sun Jan 04, 2015 6:08 pm

Matt- Nice find. The tallest Tulip I've measured in Ms. was to 132'. Lidar sure makes finding tall trees a bit easier. Although I still enjoy exploring the Forests for tall trees without it also. I guess it depends on the time you have to measure in a given period. Larry

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sradivoy
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Re: Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by sradivoy » Mon Jan 05, 2015 7:28 am

Matt Markworth wrote:
sradivoy wrote:There's probably 170+ tulips along with 160+ hemlocks in there somewhere. Good luck in your search!
It's possible, but I doubt they'll be quite that tall. Maybe another Tuliptree in the mid-160's and hemlocks maxing out in the high 140's.

Matt
Fortunately many of these trees haven't reached their full potential yet. Your tulip looks very much like a work in progress. Give it another ten years, or find an older specimen under similar growing conditions. Either way its just a matter of time.

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dbhguru
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Re: Tall Southern Ohio Tuliptree

Post by dbhguru » Mon Jan 05, 2015 8:59 am

Matt,

Do you have a good summary for tulip trees in Ohio? Like white pine, we've collected a mountain of measurements for the species and should be able to make some projections.

We have data for the species in a number of states including North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Ohio. We have a little data from other states including Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Alabama, Arkansas, Michigan, etc., but I don't think we can nail down reliable maximums for the latter states yet.

I'm really curious about Indiana. The tulip tree is Indiana's state tree.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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