An American Elm

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

Post Reply
User avatar
sradivoy
Posts: 431
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2011 8:23 pm

An American Elm

Post by sradivoy » Sat Sep 13, 2014 10:55 am

I came across this magnificent specimen not along ago on a small town square in the historic section of Bedford, Ohio. The exquisite beauty combined with its sheer magnitude knocked my socks off. No measurements were taken. The crown spread is enormous! If there is such a thing as a perfect tree, this would be it for me. Enjoy!
Attachments
016.JPG
015.JPG
014.JPG
013.JPG
011.JPG
010.JPG
009.JPG
008.JPG
002.JPG

User avatar
Rand
Posts: 1217
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:25 pm

Re: An American Elm

Post by Rand » Sat Sep 13, 2014 11:13 am

I've seen so many young elms that looked like they were on the path of such greatness die of DED in NW that I think such views were quite common place a hundred years ago. Pretty heartbreaking.

User avatar
sradivoy
Posts: 431
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2011 8:23 pm

Re: An American Elm

Post by sradivoy » Sat Sep 13, 2014 12:43 pm

This tree appears quite healthy, and exudes a sense of grace under pressure.

User avatar
Rand
Posts: 1217
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:25 pm

Re: An American Elm

Post by Rand » Sat Sep 13, 2014 6:07 pm

sradivoy wrote:This tree appears quite healthy, and exudes a sense of grace under pressure.
Yeah, they do that...right up to the season they die.

The problem with NW ohio is the land was originally swampland and the surrounding woodlots and waste spaces are just full of young elms, always providing a ready reservoir/transmission ladder for the disease. On of the more unpleasant things I've watched, is how DED will burn its way along a fencerow or grown up watercourse over a number of years, eventually killing all the elms in its path (leaving another crop of elm seedlings in its wake, to repeat the process a few decades later). In a woodlot the disease can jump around, killing or skipping over trees without any real rhyme or reason, but eventual all the elms of any size will die. Cities or the yards of individual farm houses seem to be the best places for them, as the distance between individual trees seems to provide decent protection for awhile.

User avatar
sradivoy
Posts: 431
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2011 8:23 pm

Re: An American Elm

Post by sradivoy » Sun Sep 14, 2014 11:18 am

From what I briefly read on the internet the Elm Bark Beetle is the transmission vehicle for the fungus. That would help explain why the disease would appear to " jump around, killing or skipping over trees without any real rhyme or reason". Such an obstacle course would be a joke for the athletic beetle to traverse. Control the beetle you control the disease. Easier said than done. I look forward to the day, in the not to distant future, where tiny robotic, insect like drones, will be programmed to kill off these little buggers. Although global warming warming is a far bigger concern of mine as far as trees go. Enjoy them while they last is all I can say!

User avatar
Erik Danielsen
Posts: 859
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 5:46 pm

Re: An American Elm

Post by Erik Danielsen » Sun Sep 14, 2014 1:08 pm

I've observed the same locally; an old woodlot I'm working on a report for has very many young and sapling elms but none survive past about 30ft tall and 10"dbh, but there's an absolutely magnificent elm thriving in a very narrow street margin strip on a residential street just about half a mile away. I'll have to confirm sometime whether it's actually american elm or some hybrid but it has definitely been there for quite a while.

For what it's worth, it would probably be simpler and less costly in the near future to modify the genes of existing pathogenic organisms to target and control pest organisms than to build nanoscale robots from the ground up to accomplish such a task. On the other hand, the implications of that technology becoming ubiquitous are nearly as scary as the mounting impacts of climate change.

User avatar
sradivoy
Posts: 431
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2011 8:23 pm

Re: An American Elm

Post by sradivoy » Sun Sep 14, 2014 1:34 pm

"On the other hand, the implications of that technology becoming ubiquitous are nearly as scary as the mounting impacts of climate change."

That's for sure Erik. That will mark the end of privacy as we know it. Beware of the proverbial "fly on the wall". It may not be what you think. Big Brother is just around the corner.

User avatar
Erik Danielsen
Posts: 859
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 5:46 pm

Re: An American Elm

Post by Erik Danielsen » Sun Sep 14, 2014 8:05 pm

I was really referring more to the growing accessibility of biotechnology than nanotech surveillance. A robotic fly on the wall, excepting a scenario like Michael Chricton's "Swarm," is at least likely to be guided by a human intent. Modified pathogenic organisms from a malicious or short-sighted source are unlikely to have an "off" switch. I'd rather deal with "big brother," and we probably all already do- the majority of us already carry around advanced devices that can be used to monitor us without our knowing, and many pay good money to have the latest and greatest models. Abuses have occurred already, but "big brother" is just a collection of humans, and I imagine most of them do carry a conscience.

Post Reply

Return to “Ohio”