The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

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dantheman9758
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The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by dantheman9758 » Tue Aug 09, 2011 1:24 am

The Cleveland Metroparks addresses public concerns on EAB.


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Q: WHERE AND HOW MANY ASH TREES MIGHT HAVE TO BE REMOVED FROM CLEVELAND
METROPARKS FOLLOWING INFESTATION BY EMERALD ASH BORER?

A: INFESTED ASH TREES THAT BECOME HAZARDOUS TO PUBLIC SAFETY WILL BE
SYSTEMATICALLY REMOVED FROM PUBLIC FACILITY / USER AREAS. A TALLY OF ASH
TREE SPECIMENS IN PUBLIC AREAS SUCH AS PICNIC AREAS AND GOLF COURSES HAS
BEEN COMPLETED AS OF MARCH OF 2007. THIS TALLY WILL PROVIDE CLEVELAND
METROPARKS WITH DATA TO CREATE ESTIMATES OF TIME, LABOR AND COSTS
ASSOCIATED WITH TREE REMOVAL FOR EACH POTENTIAL INFESTATION ZONE.

Translation: ("ALL OF THEM.")


Q: WILL INFESTED OR DEAD ASH TREES BE REMOVED FROM THE INTERIOR FORESTS THAT
ARE NOT HAZARDOUS TO THE VISITING PUBLIC?

A: INFESTED AND DEAD ASH TREES THAT DO NOT POSE A HAZARDOUS THREAT TO
VISITORS WILL REMAIN IN THE INTERIOR AREAS. AS ALWAYS, TREES ADJACENT TO
TRAILS OR OTHER PUBLIC STRUCTURES IN THE INTERIOR FOREST ZONES WILL BE
MONITORED AND REMOVED IF DETERMINED HAZARDOUS.

Translation: ("The dead trees in the forest are well hidden, its the ones seen in public we need to take care of.")


Q: IS THERE A PLAN TO SPRAY THE FORESTS WITH A PESTICIDE TO KILL THE EMERALD ASH
BORER?

A: AT THIS POINT IN TIME THERE HAS NOT BEEN A PRODUCT DISCOVERED THAT WILL
INTERRUPT THE LIFE CYCLE OF EMERALD ASH BORER OR SUCCEED AS A LARGE
SCALE AERIAL APPLICATION TYPE OF PESTICIDE. THE FACT THAT THE LARVAL STAGE
OF EAB TUNNELS WELL INTO THE TREE, GREATLY REDUCES THE CHANCE FOR
INSECTICIDE TO HAVE ANY EFFECT. THERE ARE A FEW SYSTEMIC PRODUCTS WITH
THE ACTIVE INGREDIENT OF IMIDACLOPRID APPLIED VIA INJECTION OR SOIL DRENCH
TECHNIQUES THAT HAVE SHOWN PROMISING RESULTS. THIS IS ON A TREE BY TREE
BASIS AND MUST BE REAPPLIED PERIODICALLY.

Translation:("Many options exist, but we've decided not to try any.")

http://www.clemetparks.com/pdf/EAB%20In ... 9May09.pdf <---- Pulled directly from their own website is this pdf detailing the pesticide options that can be exercised for saving ash trees.
http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2011/07 ... tever.html <---- And an example of their ash removal method.

If any park system in my area had the financial might to treat some of their EAB on a regular basis it would be Cleveland Metro Parks - One of the top U.S. urban park systems. Their apathy is a big disappointment.

Since the park took the sit-down approach I guess it all depends on the wildlife lol. Some of the forests around here have up to 7 species of woodpecker, which I've read can remove up to 95 percent of EAB from a tree. Does anyone know if woodpecker are actually capable of slowing or stopping the EAB die-off?

War Bird.

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At least he's happy

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Rand
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Re: The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by Rand » Tue Aug 09, 2011 8:13 am

I'm doubtful about woodpeckers stopping EAB. After 5 years of hearing about it, great masses of ash trees are dieing between Columbus and Findlay this summer. Granted the forest is more fragmented in NW ohio vs the Cleveland area, but the precent isn't good.

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dantheman9758
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Re: The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by dantheman9758 » Tue Aug 09, 2011 9:10 am

Yeah its definitely wishful thinking... Such a shame, now that I can ID ash I see them everywhere

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Will Blozan
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Re: The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by Will Blozan » Tue Aug 09, 2011 2:48 pm

Dan,

Damn, the cost for treating the trees on the trails would be far less than removal. I don't get it. I guess their mission statement, "Cleveland Metroparks will conserve significant natural resources and enhance people's lives by providing safe, high-quality outdoor education, recreation, and zoological opportunities." doesn't apply here.

Are they going to cut down the hemlocks too? The place will be wasted.

Will

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jamesrobertsmith
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Re: The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by jamesrobertsmith » Tue Aug 09, 2011 9:20 pm

Damn. The more I read here (and elsewhere) the more hopeless I become. The world is awash in wealth, and yet none of that wealth is spent to preserve the system of life that keeps us going. We're totally screwed.

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Steve Galehouse
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Re: The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by Steve Galehouse » Tue Aug 09, 2011 9:36 pm

Dan. Will, ENTS-

I doubt anything will be done to control EAB in the Cleveland Metroparks. The pest is already prevalent in the western Metroparks, and no control has been attempted to my knowledge. Garlic mustard seems to be the poster child of pests in the park system, and it's not uncommon to see Scout groups yanking garlic mustard from the ground, freeing up competition to benefit Japanese and Tatarian honeysuckle. I think any pest that requires a chemical control is a hard sell, especially since all the specious promotion of "organic" products.

I'm glad we have the opportunity to record and photograph the parks as the currently exist.

Steve
every plant is native somewhere

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Rand
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Re: The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by Rand » Tue Aug 09, 2011 9:36 pm

But this yacht makes me feel so much more awesome than a couple stupidass trees that all look pretty much the same anyway:
Screen shot 2011-08-09 at 10.31.21 PM.jpg
I wish I was exaggerating but not by much. I was rafting at the New river and some guy commented how green everything was compared to the old coal mining days and how it proved how stupid the environmentalist were trying to preserve everything.

<groan>

Yeah and in another 200 years there will be trees 6' dbh just like they show being hauled out by shaw steam engines in the visitor center.

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dantheman9758
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Re: The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by dantheman9758 » Wed Aug 10, 2011 4:42 pm

Will,

Based on the cleanly cut stumps, the dead Chestnut were likely removed the same way in the 1930's. This might even be responsible for why I can't find so much as a young sprout, even though Chestnut was a dominate species in it's associated forest type. If there was any glimmer of life in those root systems or seeds, their fate could have been definitively sealed by the cut-and-extract method. Ash will continue to suffer this fate and probably be entirely gone in 5 years.

Hemlock will waste the park, the fading, but still present mictium forest is co-dominated by Hemlock, and half of the parks ravines are entirely painted with Hemlock. Combined with Ash they make up as much as 10 percent of the parks tree's. Oh and they can kiss their precious "Virgin white-pine" stand good bye, those things barely grow, and appear very dependent on the surrounding Hemlock.

You think any of that is bad, wait until beech-bark disease. There goes 50 percent of all biological material in the park, and any other old-growth in northeast Ohio. The primary dominate species of both old-growth associated forests in the park. I can picture it now, first skeletons, then stumps as far as the eye can see between widely spaced maple and Oak tree's. Than the unexpected die-offs of the co-dependent species that they didn't anticipate. Before you know it the National Natural Landmark A. B. Williams woods have turned into a canopy-less mess of in-passable undergrowth.

All this is not an exaggeration. Its the reality of what will happen to this old-growth forest based on the parks passive stance in regards to the ecologically devastating invasive pests that are knocking on the parks door.



I wonder if CMP is familiar with mathematics.

beech-bark disease + Beech-Maple forest (beech = <50% volume) + chainsaw treatment
multiplied by
(beech-bark disease + hemlock-adelgid + chestnut blight) + Beech-Hemlock-Chestnut-Oak forest (beech+hemlock+chestnut = <65% volume) + chainsaw treatment

double checked the math, the answer I came up with was an expletive

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Rand
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Re: The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by Rand » Wed Aug 10, 2011 8:54 pm

Based on the cleanly cut stumps, the dead Chestnut were likely removed the same way in the 1930's. This might even be responsible for why I can't find so much as a young sprout, even though Chestnut was a dominate species in it's associated forest type. If there was any glimmer of life in those root systems or seeds, their fate could have been definitively sealed by the cut-and-extract method. Ash will continue to suffer this fate and probably be entirely gone in 5 years.
I'm a little wary of your explanation. Chestnut is unusual in that even mature trees will stump sprout. In my reading most sprouts are claimed to be seedlings stuck in state of suspended animation by the blight, but you do occasionally find old stump rings from mature trees. Here's an example from Cathedral State Park in West Virginia:
chestnut stump sprouts.jpg
If you look closely you can see 3 persistent sprouting arranged around a perimeter 2'-3' in diameter.

I think a better explanation is that chestnut has limited shade tolerance. I see lots of sprouts under oak dominated dry sites with a fairly open understory, but rarely under moister sites with a heavier canopy and understory. Beech, Maple and hemlock are all very shaded tolerant and cast deep shade that I don't think chestnut can tolerate. If you go look along the dry bluff edges, with gnarly old oaks you might find some.

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dantheman9758
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Re: The Cleveland Metroparks - EAB solution

Post by dantheman9758 » Thu Aug 11, 2011 7:48 am

Rand

Thank you for the correction, I was purely speculating and did not know how tolerant chestnut are of cutting, or shade tolerance - I'm a rookie... still learning! haha

Dan

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