White Pine - Zaleski

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sradivoy
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Re: White Pine - Zaleski

Post by sradivoy » Tue Dec 01, 2015 4:47 pm

dbhguru wrote:Stefan, Matt,

Exciting news! Once again we have the tulips and great whites duking it out for height dominance.

Bob

Actually, the tulips won that battle in Ohio (the fifteen tallest trees are all tulips, with many more unknown). The real battle is for second place between the white pines, hemlocks, and sycamores. They are only within a foot of two from each other, with the white pines having many more 150 plus trees than either the hemlocks or sycamores which only a few known 150 plus trees each. This is where most of the action is taking place. The tulips are just battling amongst themselves for dominance. There are quite a few sycamores just below 150 that will be coming in line shortly, much more than the hemlocks. The eventual pecking order of the "big four" will be tulips, white pines, sycamores, and hemlocks. The hemlocks, unfortunately, will be phased out by either global warming or HWA. That will be catastrophic for hocking hills region. I dread the thought.

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dbhguru
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Re: White Pine - Zaleski

Post by dbhguru » Tue Dec 01, 2015 6:57 pm

Matt,

Understood. I think Liriodendron is going to win more than it loses below around latitude 41 degrees. There are so many more places supporting liriodendron in the southerly latitudes. The number of NTS reports of tulips exceeding 150 feet are remarkable.

In historical times Pennsylvania may have been the epicenter of white pine development favoring great height. Southern New England would have likely been close. The big question is whether any of those accounts of phenomenal white pines in sNew Hampshire and southern Maine hold water. My current belief is that they don't.

One cannot make the argument that people measured tree height better in those days than is true today. As we know in NTS mis-measured trees have saturated the big tree lists. I'll not go much farther there. Suffice it to say that improving accuracy had to wait on the laser rangefinder and the Sine Method.

Today Ray Asselin and I were on the property of Smith College. Ray wants to do a film on tuliptrees, and they have a scattering growing on an old terrance of the Mill River.

Here are a few images.

1st Image: Sophia Smith TT: Hgt = 136.8 ft, Cir = 14.2 ft
SmithCollegeTT-BigOne.jpg
2n and 3rd images. Same tree, not named yet: Hgt = 132.0 ft, Cir = 13.1 ft
SmithCollegeTT-1a.jpg
SmithCollegeTT-1b.jpg
The latitude is approx. 42.3 degrees.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Matt Markworth
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Re: White Pine - Zaleski

Post by Matt Markworth » Tue Dec 01, 2015 7:23 pm

Bob,

(I think you were trying to respond to Stefan in the last post) I haven't spent enough time in the eastern part of Ohio to get a sense of how much more growth potential the white pines have over there, but would agree that tuliptree currently has the height advantage in Ohio.

Those two tuliptrees in Massachusetts are phenomenal! What a treasure. Apparently tuliptree can do quite well at the edge of it's range up there given the right conditions.

Matt

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sradivoy
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Re: White Pine - Zaleski

Post by sradivoy » Tue Dec 01, 2015 8:56 pm

Also worth mentioning, virtually all of the tall white pines 150' and above, with one known exception, are farm raised from two specific locations, one of which has a high mortality rate.

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sradivoy
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Re: White Pine - Zaleski

Post by sradivoy » Sun Jan 22, 2017 7:42 pm

I stopped by this location once again after visiting Lake Hope to verify a solitary 160 hit I got on a tree last year. Unfortunately I couldn't locate said tree and have no idea where it might be. So my claim of a 160' pine is a bit premature and should be discarded for now. However, I did find the 155 pine I measured last year and got two hits at 156' and 158' for an average of 157', which would make it one of the tallest known in the state. I'll leave it to the experts to make a more accurate determination on which is the tallest. This one has a similar girth to the one that was climbed.
Attachments
Pitchfork Pine: 157'ht x 9'7"cbh
Pitchfork Pine: 157'ht x 9'7"cbh

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