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Henderson Shores Unique Area

Posted: Mon Aug 26, 2019 2:52 pm
by ElijahW
NTS,

I spent a couple hours this morning at Henderson Shores Unique Area, a state-owned property along the eastern shore of Lake Ontario. I didn’t do any serious measuring, mostly because nothing gets very large that close to the windward side of the lake. For a tree to exceed 50,’ for example, would be unusual. I did take an inventory of the tree and shrub species I encountered, as well as a few photos, and I’d like to share those.

Species Observed

Northern Red Oak
Bur Oak
Chinkapin Oak
Shagbark Hickory
White Ash
Black Ash
American Basswood
American Elm
Sugar Maple
Black Cherry
Paper Birch
Eastern Hophornbeam
Common Serviceberry
Nannyberry
Common Prickly-Ash
European Buckthorn
Northern White Cedar
Eastern Redcedar
White Spruce
Eastern White Pine
Common Juniper (ground-dwelling)
Redcedar dominates
Redcedar dominates
Prickly-Ash
Prickly-Ash
Northern White & Redcedar together
Northern White & Redcedar together
Common Juniper nearby
Common Juniper nearby
A nice Chinkapin Oak along the lakeshore
A nice Chinkapin Oak along the lakeshore
Looking across the bay to the north
Looking across the bay to the north
Redcedar is by far the most common tree in the Unique Area, probably followed by White Ash and Shagbark Hickory. I was hoping to come across some nice Nannyberries like Jess Riddle several years ago, but I only saw a handful of young ones. Overall, this Unique Area is a great place for a quiet walk, and the lake views just add to its beauty.

Elijah

Re: Henderson Shores Unique Area

Posted: Wed Aug 28, 2019 7:54 am
by Erik Danielsen
What an interesting place! I bet the herbaceous flora is also unusual. It would seem like a good place to look for Rock Elm, though it may not be there. I saw signs for this place while driving up to the adirondacks when we were up there together, and wondered what might be there.

Re: Henderson Shores Unique Area

Posted: Sun Sep 01, 2019 3:18 pm
by ElijahW
Erik,

I thought it was great, even though devoid of large trees. I was on the lookout for Rock Elm, but didn't come across any. It may still be present, though.

The Unique Area and adjacent Robert Wehle State Park were used for military training until after WWII, so the landscape may have been more diverse in earlier times. The off-trail wetter areas likely would be more interesting; parts of the main trail are choked with what appears to be Pale Swallow-Wart and lined with European Buckthorn - not a great aesthetic combination.

Elijah