Canadaway Creek in Arkwright, NY

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Canadaway Creek in Arkwright, NY

Post by Erik Danielsen » Sun Aug 26, 2018 8:46 pm

Bob,

Elijah is doing some excellent record-keeping in this regard, with a list of sites with RHIs over 120, a list of sites where at least one species exceeds 130', etc. I am a bit less organized and mostly just have my own data on hand. Any information Wessels might appreciate about NY, I'd be happy to help contribute to.

I find it interesting to think about the inevitable mismatch in site sizes for these comparisons. Some sites make their RHI in a dozen acres, others compile whole watersheds. As the watershed of the Canadaway includes Lilydale, its whole-watershed RHI10 is 129.7. I don't think it makes sense to combine the sites for comparison to most other sites we have listed for NY, but as an additional perspective it alters my appreciation of the watershed's tree growth potential.

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Canadaway Creek in Arkwright, NY

Post by Erik Danielsen » Tue Oct 02, 2018 10:53 am

Recently I had a chance to check out another private parcel, less than a mile downstream from the tallest hickories and tulips. The slopes leading down to the creek here are covered in tall bitternut hickory, tuliptree, sycamore, and other species (a couple butternuts showed up as well). I look forward to exploring the slopes after leaf-off. At the bottom, however, are some floodplains with loose, sandy soil with a number of large sycamores and cottonwoods, along with tuliptree, bitternut hickory, cucumber magnolia, and other mixed-mesophytic species succeeding in. I took time to measure a few whose crowns could be conveniently sighted. I also wandered through another parcel across the creek (same ownership as the tallest hickory and tulip spot) with some very substantial hardwoods, and then into a county-owned parcel with a decent norway spruce plantation surrounded by other substantial hardwoods (including a monster cottonwood, not yet measured) and a couple white pines, one of which is a new rucker tree for the gorge. There is lots to document in this section after the leaves come off! Just this brief survey significantly boosted the RHI10.

American Sycamore
130.5' / 8.69'cbh
130' / triple
120.5' / 10.99'cbh
Tuliptree
130' many others like this
Eastern Cottonwood
125' / 8.36'cbh
119' / 9.15'cbh
White Pine
122.5' rushed measurement in failing light- may be taller
Bitternut Hickory
110.5' / 6.53'cbh much taller specimens further up the slope

This brings the RHI10 for the gorge up to 123.4.
Attachments
The nearer trunk is the 125' cottonwood. These have excellent high-branching columnar forms, like the trees in Stewart Park.
The nearer trunk is the 125' cottonwood. These have excellent high-branching columnar forms, like the trees in Stewart Park.

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Canadaway Creek in Arkwright, NY

Post by Erik Danielsen » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:44 pm

This year, a group out of SUNY Fredonia is publishing a book on the cultural and natural history of the Canadaway Creek, and I was invited to write a section discussing the trees and forests associated with the creek. While it avoids being too technical for the most part, members here will be glad to know that a bit of NTS-style data and analysis (rucker index, at least) is included, particularly in discussing the rich-mesophytic forest type found in the deep central ravine.

This motivated me to improve the thoroughness of the RHI10 for the creek, so I spent a few sessions in the last few months gathering the following measurements. A few highlights: Sycamore takes the lead from Tulip with two standouts among a number of great forest-grown sycamores on a slope competing with younger tuliptrees, and a new state height maximum for Black Cherry. The Cherry is located in a large grove of young tulips from 120-130' on the top of a bluff, which have the watershed's tallest black cherries and red oaks forced into competition, drained by a short and narrow ravine that contains two large, old tulips rooted on steep slopes. The broader steep slope below the bluff contains more old tulips, oaks, and an excellent cucumber magnolia. Just below these are the previously reported tallest tulip, bitternut hickory, slippery elm, and shagbark hickory.

Measurements:

Eastern Sycamore
137.5' / 9.5'cbh
136' / 8.7'cbh
122.5'
Tuliptree
132' / 5.6'cbh
131.5' / 7.6'cbh
131' / 10.5'cbh
129.5' / 10.5'cbh
Black Cherry
132.3' / 4.7'cbh skinny, small-crowned “reacher” of a tree
122' / 6'cbh
Eastern Cottonwood
125.5' / 8.4'cbh remeasure
122.5' / 9.1'cbh
114' large stem on posted land, measured from across creek
105.5' / 14.9'cbh
Northern Red Oak
120' / 6.4'cbh
119' / double
114'
Bitternut Hickory
124' / 7.2'cbh gorgeous standout tree in shorter maple-basswood area
White Pine
122.5' / 8.8'cbh remeasure, got same height as last summer, added girth
Norway Spruce
117' / 6.1'cbh
112.5' / 7'cbh
Shagbark Hickory
114' / 6.2'cbh remeasure
Eastern Hemlock
114' / 6.7'cbh
111.5'
111' / 7.1'cbh
Slippery Elm
112' / 6.7'cbh remeasure
Cucumber Magnolia
107.5' great columnar trunk
Butternut
105.5' /double, up on the slope with the tall sycamores

This raises the RHI10 for now to 126.6
Attachments
Striking Cucumber Magnolia on the steep slope- possibly pretty old, as there are few signs of logging and many other old trees on the slope, by contrast to the surrounding flats and uplands.
Striking Cucumber Magnolia on the steep slope- possibly pretty old, as there are few signs of logging and many other old trees on the slope, by contrast to the surrounding flats and uplands.
Dense stand of younger tulips averaging 120-130'
Dense stand of younger tulips averaging 120-130'
Older Tulip in the steep ravine- 131'/10.5'cbh
Older Tulip in the steep ravine- 131'/10.5'cbh
This Sycamore is the tallest tree in the watershed as of this past May.
This Sycamore is the tallest tree in the watershed as of this past May.

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ElijahW
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Re: Canadaway Creek in Arkwright, NY

Post by ElijahW » Sun Jun 23, 2019 9:42 pm

Erik,

Fantastic trees!

How are the Sycamores doing in your area? Up here, most have very few leaves. Either they’re being eaten by something or the trees just aren’t fully leafing out due to some kind of stress. I haven’t gotten a close look at any yet to be able to tell.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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DougBidlack
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Re: Canadaway Creek in Arkwright, NY

Post by DougBidlack » Mon Jun 24, 2019 6:39 am

Elijah,

the sycamores likely have sycamore anthracnose, a fungal disease that is most prevalent in wet springs like we are currently experiencing in the Northeast. Our sycamores here in eastern Massachusetts are similarly effected.

Doug

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ElijahW
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Re: Canadaway Creek in Arkwright, NY

Post by ElijahW » Mon Jun 24, 2019 3:23 pm

Doug,

Thanks for the explanation. I’ll have to check some Sycamore leaves now and see what they look like. The temperature has risen to reasonable expectations lately, but the rain machine has been working overtime since early Spring.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Canadaway Creek in Arkwright, NY

Post by Erik Danielsen » Tue Jun 25, 2019 7:13 am

Elijah, that's interesting... around here it seemed the sycamores were last to leaf out, but they did put on nice full crowns when they did. It's been a high-precipitation spring here but with concentrated rain periods interspersed with a couple days at a time of warm sunny weather. Still no good for making hay, but the trees seem happy aside from the ash and my friend's doomed giant sequoia.

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