Staten Island Greenbelt

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Staten Island Greenbelt

Post by Erik Danielsen » Tue Apr 05, 2016 11:38 am

Brian, I have experienced that it will shoot as much as 0.7 yards shorter than my old bushnell (never a full yard) but this is complicated by the fact that the old bushnell only reads in full yards, and quite possibly rounds up. When I had the chance to shoot one of Bob's Trupulse units alongside my old bushnell, my old bushnell also tended to shoot up to a yard long compared to the trupulse- so if anything, while the Scout DX 1000 might read an object as slightly less tall than the older Bushnell, I'd place more stock in its accuracy. I'm still getting greater heights on a lot of trees than with the old bushnell for the most part, probably due mostly to its capacity to read from points in the crown that the older model can't "see." Also wondered- is yours the Scout 1000 ARC, or the Scout DX 1000 ARC? The model names are close enough to be confusing, but your review mentioned that yours won't display angle in brush mode. My unit (a DX) does display angle in brush mode.

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bbeduhn
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Re: Staten Island Greenbelt

Post by bbeduhn » Wed Apr 06, 2016 7:33 am

Erik,
I wasn't aware of a different model of Scout. I believe I have a slightly different model than you do. It's pretty solid for an inexpensive laser. Your greater heights are very possibly due to better resolution on high twigs. Between the Nikon 440 and the Nikon Riflehunter, I get better resolution from the Riflehunter but the 440 still beats that much newer model in every other way.

My Scout only shoots a full yard shorter on great distances, greater than I would be using on almost any tree. I should put it to more use.
Brian

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Staten Island Greenbelt

Post by Erik Danielsen » Fri Apr 08, 2016 10:35 pm

In my first post about Willowbrook park I described the first section of woodland as one moves south from the ballfield as a rather uninteresting young wet forest consisting of a handful of species and not much else. Wednesday 4/6 I returned to Willowbrook when I had a spare couple hours. On a whim I first moved east in that first stand instead of south to the area I was planning to measure, and ended up devoting the rest of my measuring time to what I found. Stand age and diversity increase significantly just past the screen of thin red maple and sweetgum. I mistook the first thick, nearly 3'dbh trunk I met for a red oak with odd bark before realizing that this was in fact what old pin oaks look like.
One of the old, tall pin oaks.
One of the old, tall pin oaks.
Large, mature pin oaks share this eastern portion with mature specimens of sweetgum, red oak, red maple, and green ash, a few large emergent tuliptrees, and some younger beech, hickories, and black birch. Heights here are typical to somewhat taller than typical for these species on staten island, though rich wet sites like this are scarce to compare to. Red Oak seems especially favored by this site. Craggy crowns on many specimens results in a very pleasing aesthetic to this forest. The tallest pin oak stood as the new state max at the time. Stems between 2-3" dbh are common, with significant buttressing in many species due to the very wet soils. Also present and unexpected was a single odd tree whose bark looked most like white oak, except that there were no white oak leaves- there were leaves that looked like chestnut oak, but no chestnut oak stems... finally, the first mature Swamp Chestnut Oak I've encountered on Staten Island! Old sources refer to their being a minor presence in some of the oak barrens elsewhere on the island, but most of those sites have long since been developed. The numbers-
Red Maple
100.5
100.3
99.3
Black Birch
90.3
Bitternut Hickory
101.3
American Beech
100.8
98
97.5
97.3
Green Ash
103.4
103.2
102.8
Sweetgum
107.9
106.6
105.3
102.4
Tuliptree
113.2
112.1
111
Swamp Chestnut Oak
92.6
Pin Oak
108.6
104.8
104.2
Northern Red Oak
114.8
113.2
109.8
105.6
102.8
Trout Lilies are blooming!
Trout Lilies are blooming!

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Staten Island Greenbelt

Post by Erik Danielsen » Tue Oct 25, 2016 3:24 pm

Last Friday I had the pleasure of receiving a lightly used Trupulse 200B from an ebay reseller. Some quick tests compared to my tape show it spot-on; now I just need all these leaves to finish dropping! A windy weekend thinned the canopy a little, at least. I had monday off so I took a hike to scout out some parts of the Greenbelt in and around High Rock Park. For casual measuring it's nice to finally be able to see vertical distance figures in feet in real time.

There's a narrow, steep section of forest without any trails sandwiched between a golf course and a cemetery that I was informed may have some tall trees. It's hard to navigate the underbrush in parts, but the high canopy of Tuliptree, Red Oak and sweetgum was not disappointing. There are a few steep glacial kettles, including one in which I found several exceptional heights. For context, I have measured only one red oak over 115' on all of Staten Island, and breaking 110' is uncommon enough. The two tallest Red Oaks were both in this kettle, as well as the tallest Tulip I measured in this section. Heights:

Northern Red Oak
119' 8.9'cbh With leaves off this one probably breaks 120'. There are only two other non-tulip individual trees exceeding 120' in Staten so far.
115'
111'
108.5'
107.5'
Sweetgum
108'
Japanese Pagoda Tree
93.5'
Black Birch
93'
Tuliptree
125' 8.3'cbh
121' 11'cbh
115.5'
The 119'+ Northern Red Oak
The 119'+ Northern Red Oak
125' Tuliptree
125' Tuliptree
From here I followed the woods a little ways over the border into the cemetery property (also open to the public, but it was nice that there was a hole in the fence so I didn't have to walk all the way around to the gate). There's a nice cluster of about a dozen tall, columnar tuliptrees in this little remnant peninsula of forest. They seem fairly old.

Tuliptree
123' 11.5'cbh
121.5' 10.9'cbh
120' 10.6'cbh
123' tall 11.5'cbh Tulip at the edge of the cemetery
123' tall 11.5'cbh Tulip at the edge of the cemetery
Heading back, I ended up down in the kettle in High Rock Park where the NYS max height Sweetgum is located (124.9'). Approaching from a different angle than usual I passed under a very gnarly old beech before measuring a few tall trees a bit downhill from the Sweetgum.

Northern Red Oak
102.5'
Pin Oak
105.5'
105'
Tuliptree
124.5'

All this bodes well for the season to turn up plenty more here on Staten Island.

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dbhguru
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Re: Staten Island Greenbelt

Post by dbhguru » Sun Oct 30, 2016 7:43 am

Erik,

I spotted that 93-foot black birch.Good show. In the BB database it goes.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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