Oakwood Cemetery, Chittenango, NY

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tomhoward
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Oakwood Cemetery, Chittenango, NY

Post by tomhoward » Sun Feb 21, 2016 1:18 pm

NTS,

On Sunday, Jan. 17, 2016, a cold, cloudy day with a thin slippery coating of snow on the ground, Elijah Whitcomb and I explored Oakwood Cemetery in Chittenango in Madison County. This is an old historic cemetery on a gently sloping hill off Lake St. off NY 5 just west of the main part of the village of Chittenango. This was my first visit to this site. I first heard of this site from a photo from the Syracuse newspaper from Nov. 12, 1982, seen on microfilm at OCPL Local History where I used to work. The photo showed larger old-looking Oaks.

It is an impressive site with a great many large old partly open-grown White Oaks, seeming to be at least 150 years old, with the oldest trees possibly up to 200 years old. We were not able to get any age data at this time. The oldest grave we found dates from 1833, and many of the graves date from the 1860s, including the grave of a young soldier in a Cavalry regiment who died at a military hospital in the south in 1864.

There are at least 100, possibly as many as 200 White Oaks in this cemetery. At least 90% of the trees are White Oaks. Other species include Red Oak, Red Maple, Sugar Maple, Shagbark Hickory, Bitternut Hickory (1 tree near exit), Basswood (1 tree near exit), Norway Spruce. Some of the White Oaks seem to have been planted (they were in a row), but most do not appear to have been planted. Many of the White Oaks have balding bark.

Trees measured:

Big White Oak near fence in upper area – 12’6” cbh (47.7” dbh)

Red Oak next to just above – 10’9” cbh (41” dbh)

I measured a typical White Oak (10.2 ft. cbh, 39.1” dbh) to a height of 83.8 ft.

Elijah measured a Red Maple (9’7” cbh, 36.6” dbh) to 83.9 ft., a Norway Spruce (6’5” cbh, 24.5” dbh) to 94.1 ft.

Elijah measured one of the biggest White Oaks (a tree with lime green tape around it, 13’2” cbh, 50.3” dbh) to 94.3 ft. It is a beautiful tree with a big crown.

Elijah measured a Shagbark Hickory (6’1” cbh, 23.2” dbh) to 92.8 ft, and another Shagbark Hickory near this one (6’3” cbh, 23.9” dbh) to 98.1 ft.

Elijah measured a Sugar Maple (8’9” cbh, 33.4” dbh) to 101.1 ft., the tallest tree we would measure at this site, and the only 100 ft. tree measured at this site.

I measured a White Oak with balding bark to 92.2 ft.
Elijah measured a White Oak (9’1” cbh, 34.7” dbh) next to Button grave to 98.1 ft. – this is the tallest White Oak we would measure at this site.

I measured a White Oak with balding bark in the lower part of the site (a hollow near the road) to 88.1 ft. I measured another White Oak with balding bark to 90.6 ft.

Elijah measured a big picturesque Red Oak with a huge burl over 10 ft. up, and spiral grain trunk (13’11” cbh, 53.1” dbh) to 73.3 ft. – it has a broken top, and a Red Oak next to it (11’ cbh, 42” dbh) to 89.6 ft.


Tom Howard

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ElijahW
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Re: Oakwood Cemetery, Chittenango, NY

Post by ElijahW » Sun Feb 28, 2016 9:26 am

NTS,

Some photos from Oakwood Cemetery, Chittenango:
An ominous sign
An ominous sign
DSC00711.JPG
Notice the dominance of White oak
Notice the dominance of White oak
DSC00713.JPG
Largest White oak
Largest White oak
Red oak with large burl
Red oak with large burl
Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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