Not what I expected

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Lucas
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Not what I expected

Post by Lucas » Thu Jan 14, 2016 3:29 pm

http://www.sustainablecitiescollective. ... -york-city

What are the 10 most common street trees in New York City?


http://www.wired.com/2015/04/vivid-map- ... c/#slide-1

"Even when it comes to species you might expect to find in New York—such as oak, maple, and elm—the Parks Department chose to plant Asian cultivars instead of North American ones. “There’s only one oak species on the list that isn’t from Asia—and it’s an English oak, native to Europe,” says Doug Tallamy, a wildlife ecologist from the University of Delaware."


http://jillhubley.com/project/nyctrees/#QURO

map of all the trees
Last edited by Lucas on Thu Jan 14, 2016 3:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Lucas
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Re: Not what I expected

Post by Lucas » Thu Jan 14, 2016 3:36 pm

http://www.wired.com/2015/04/vivid-map- ... c/#slide-1

"(many people think Callery pears give off an aroma reminiscent of rotting fish, chlorine, or semen—so it more-or-less fits in with NYC’s odor profile), "

ouch
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Not what I expected

Post by Erik Danielsen » Thu Jan 14, 2016 4:05 pm

That list of the 10 most common is actually about 10 years out of date- here's an article based on the latest tree census: http://allthingsnatalia.com/2014/11/21/ ... es-of-nyc/

Pin Oak jumped in the rankings (I certainly see it a lot!). I'm curious about that quote from Doug Tallamy; out of context as it is, it makes no sense. Does he mean that among the nonnative oaks, only one of them is from Europe? As included in the article it is made to sound as though only nonnative oaks are planted ever, and all but one of those asian. The abundance of pin oak, as well as of northern red, scarlet, white, and swamp white oak as street trees particularly in the outer boroughs does not reconcile with that writing. I think it's an instance of a well-meaning reporter simply not having enough background knowledge to properly contextualize a certain set of information while trying to build a reader-grabbing narrative.

Interesting that Queens has the greatest total number of street trees. Greatest number of trees period would be almost definitely be Staten Island, with its wealth of forested parks. Next up would probably be the Bronx, with Van Cortlandt Park and Pelham Bay Park (the city's largest single park) both being well-forested.

I'd like to imagine that Callery Pears are somehow nice in their native context, but I just can't.

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Lucas
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Re: Not what I expected

Post by Lucas » Thu Jan 14, 2016 4:09 pm

Erik Danielsen wrote:That list of the 10 most common is actually about 10 years out of date- here's an article based on the latest tree census: http://allthingsnatalia.com/2014/11/21/ ... es-of-nyc/
Thanks for the update.
We travel the Milky way together, trees and men. - John Muir

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Bart Bouricius
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Re: Not what I expected

Post by Bart Bouricius » Sat Jan 16, 2016 1:16 pm

The tree map either is not very accurate, or they have cut many of the larger Gingko trees. When I was taking night courses at Fordham University I always noticed the many huge Gingkos on the northern edg of the New York Botanical Garden. There were also many in the Bronx Zoo and on the Fordham campus. It seems odd that not a one shows up in these locations now,while I see dozens of them clearly on the google maps street view.

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