Green Lakes State Park, New York

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ElijahW
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Re: Green Lakes State Park, New York

Post by ElijahW » Sun Jan 06, 2019 10:15 pm

Joshua,

Thanks. Yes, Tuliptree is the only species to make 150’; Bitternut Hickory is the only other to reach 140’.

I’ll have to remember to get a picture of the Bladdernut next time I visit. Jess Riddle made me aware of the small tree/large shrub’s presence on Howlands Island a few years ago; before that, I didn’t know it existed. I’ve only seen it growing within or on the edges of mature swamp forest, subjected to regular flooding. At Green Lakes, it’s overshadowed by Basswood, White Ash, Tuliptree, and Sugar Maple; on Howlands Island, associates are Freeman Maple, Swamp White Oak, Blackgum, Tuliptree, and Shellbark Hickory.

Elijah

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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ElijahW
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Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

Re: Green Lakes State Park, New York

Post by ElijahW » Mon Feb 03, 2020 5:29 pm

NTS,

I made a visit to Green Lakes earlier today for the purpose of updating its Rucker Index, which now stands at 131.9’. All trees listed below were measured today except for the White Pine, which was last measured just over a year ago.

Tuliptree 151.4’ x 10.63’
Bitternut Hickory 141.0’ x 5.16’
Eastern Hemlock 134.0’
American Basswood 133.3’
White Ash 131.9’
Sugar Maple 129.3’ x 6.33’
Eastern Cottonwood 125.5’ x 8.0’
American Beech 125.3’ x 6.07’
Northern Red Oak 124.2’ x 11.52’
Eastern White Pine 123.1’

A few additional notes:

1. The second-tallest Bitternut Hickory is now 140.2’ x 8.95’.
2. A few of the White Ashes, including the tallest one, are now in decline or already dead. The culprit looks to be EAB; these trees showed no signs of ill health just two years ago.
3. The tallest Beech is also in questionable health; most of the crown and upper trunk look fine, but the lower trunk has at least one fungus growing out of it. The tree hasn’t had any measurable vertical growth in several years.
4. I looked for the tallest Butternut, but could not locate it. It may be dead.

Elijah

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ElijahW
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Re: Green Lakes State Park, New York

Post by ElijahW » Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:59 pm

NTS,

I forgot to mention that I also got some more age data from fallen and cut trees in the purported old growth area uphill and west of Round Lake. The center of this area is dominated by a Tuliptree “Cathedral,” as described by Tom Howard. The following trees I have rough ages for (relying on growth ring counts at time of death):

1. Tuliptree: 155 & 165 years (2 specimens)
2. American Beech: 175 years
3. Eastern Hophornbeam: 105 years
4. Eastern Hemlock: 270 years

The general picture I’m getting is that the oldest Tuliptrees are about 200 years old, with maybe a few older outliers. Other hardwoods, especially Sugar Maple, likely will have a greater maximum age, though that’s just my speculation. Hemlock and Arborvitae seem to be the oldest species, with multiple trees likely over three hundred years old.

Elijah

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