Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

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dbhguru
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by dbhguru » Thu Aug 06, 2015 7:51 pm

Tom, Erik, Elijah,

The music festival from Aug 5-9 at Cornell is the one we are at. Monica played a concert on an 1827 fortepiano> She played on the 5th. It went very well. She has her Graaf 1819 replica over here, and several pianists will perform on it, including two Russians. However, scheduling is turning out to be a problem. If anyone is around tomorrow, maybe we could meet at the Park.

Tomorrow, we're going to take a break and visit Stewart Park at 2:00PM. I'll measure as many cottonwoods as I can. I may be available for Saturday AM, but am tied up Saturday PM. I apologize, but I'm just not in control of my time.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by Erik Danielsen » Fri Aug 07, 2015 11:40 am

Ah, just left a voicemail in response to your email but hadn't seen this more detailed explanation. This does make a bit of a conundrum. I'm working today, believe Elijah is too. Tom might be free.

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tomhoward
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by tomhoward » Fri Aug 07, 2015 11:57 am

I am free, but there is no way I can get to Ithaca today, as I have no vehicle.

As far as I know, Elijah and I are going to Ithaca late tomorrow morning.

Tom Howard

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ElijahW
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by ElijahW » Sun Jan 17, 2016 10:06 am

NTS,

On 1/3/16, I made a quick visit to Cornell Plantations to get a height measurement for the Shumard oak previously measured just for girth. On the way in, I stumbled across a few interesting trees that Tom Howard and I missed earlier. Below is a list of trees measured on 1/3/16:

Eastern white pine
135.1'
130.0'
127.4' x 9'3"

Scots pine
120.7' x 5'0"

Red pine
107.8' x 4'0"

Sawtooth oak
65.0' x 5'4"

Yellow lantern magnolia
34.0' x 2'2"

Shumard oak
89.2' x 9'3"

Tom and I will be back to Cornell at some point. It obviously has taller trees than we thought, and probably more old growth on some of the steep hillsides.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Jess Riddle
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by Jess Riddle » Sun Jan 17, 2016 10:11 am

Elijah,

That Scots pine sounds like a really nice find. I've never heard of them that tall in this part of the world.

Jess

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djluthringer
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by djluthringer » Wed Jan 20, 2016 3:38 pm

Yeh,

That Scots pine is off the charts!

Dale

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ElijahW
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by ElijahW » Mon Apr 02, 2018 6:17 pm

NTS,

I recently remeasured the tall Scots Pine with the Trupulse 200X (previous measurement was with Nikon 440 & clinometer). The tree has been downgraded a bit to 119.1'. It looks to be in great health and has an intact top, so I think the height discrepancy is due to the Nikon giving an inflated reading to the top originally.

In other news, this afternoon I checked out a section of Cornell Plantation across Fall Creek, a major tributary to Cayuga Lake. A foot bridge and the well-maintained Cayuga Trails http://cayugatrailsclub.org/trails/ system was a great help in navigating through the woods and upland plantations.

After walking a short distance through scrubby young floodplain forest, I came upon a ravine and hillside like I've never seen. Primarily an oak-hickory forest, the oaks played second fiddle to the hickories. White Oak is very common, though it doesn't get as tall as it seems it should. Red Oak is probably less common, but grows very well. Black Oak is few in number and stature, and, along with White Oak, doesn't seems to be able to break 110' in height. I was able to measure four hickory species: Red, Pignut, Bitternut, and Shagbark. I didn't notice the Pignuts until I was almost finished, so their height maximum is not representative of what they actually achieve at this site. All four species will certain exceed 120' with more searching.

White Pine reaches similar heights on this side of the creek as on the Arboretum side. These pines may have been planted in the eighteenth century, but that's not certain; they are native to the area and grow very well in the Finger Lakes region as a whole.

On to the numbers:

White Pine

136.8' (at least one more of similar height)

Red Hickory

131.8' (Several around 130'; 135' would not be a surprise)
123.5'

Shagbark Hickory

128.0' x 6.55' (NY maximum height)

White Ash

125.7'

Black Cherry

121.5'

Northern Red Oak

120.0'

Sugar Maple

118.3'

Eastern Hemlock

116.6'
109.8'

American Sycamore

113.7'

Bitternut Hickory

112.3'

Red Maple

112.3'

Pignut Hickory

112.0'

Black Birch

93.1' x 4.88'

Preliminary Rucker 10: 122.4'

My guess is that the oldest trees in this forest are between 150 and 200 years, but that's just a guess. The preponderance of hickories seems to indicate cutting at some point, but relatively little disturbance since.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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ElijahW
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by ElijahW » Mon Apr 09, 2018 5:07 pm

NTS,

A few more measured trees from the opposite side of Fall Creek (inside the Arboretum proper):

Norway Spruce

124.5'

Tuliptree

120.6'

Black Cherry

114.4' x 11.76'

Eastern Hemlock

114.2'

Red Pine

112.1'
111.0'

I came across a fallen White Pine log that had been cut to clear the walking trail and counted approximately 95 growth rings (diameter of the log was 27"). The fallen tree's bark appears older than 100 years, and my age estimation would have been closer to 150. The tallest White Pines in this section have the same bark color and texture, and were measured by both Tom Howard and I last year to over 135'. My assumption is that the other planted trees in this section date from the 1930s at the earliest, and perhaps into the 1950s.

Collective Rucker Height Index for Cornell Plantations as of today:

Eastern White Pine: 136.8
Red Hickory: 131.8
Shagbark Hickory: 128.0
White Ash: 125.6
Norway Spruce: 124.5
Black Cherry: 121.5
Tuliptree: 120.6
Northern Red Oak: 120.0
Scots Pine: 119.1
Sugar Maple: 118.3

Average: 124.6'

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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ElijahW
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by ElijahW » Mon Apr 16, 2018 5:55 pm

NTS,

I spent some more time in the general area of the “Monkey Run” trail, above Fall Creek, yesterday.

My primary mission was to suss out some differences between the Red & Pignut hickories, which was largely a failure. Without leaves present, I’m not confident in most cases to make a judgment call one way or another. Both pear- and oval-shaped nuts were abundant on the ground, but the bark was no help at all. Some trees had very dark (almost black) interlacing ridges, some were relatively light in color; some trees had deep ridges with a large “shag” factor, some had deep ridges with no shag; some trees had shallow ridges yet were still shaggy. Many trees had different bark characteristics on opposing sides of the trunk. I need more information.

My secondary mission was to document some additional trees, which was successful. I also remeasured the previously listed Red Hickory from a better vantage point, and got a slightly higher top, at 134.3’ x 6.69’ (CBH). Other trees measured not listed above:

Eastern White Pine

136.7’ x 8.72’

Larch spp. (not native; likely x marschlinsii)

126.2’

Red Maple

125.1’

Bitternut Hickory

122.8’ x 4.78’

White Oak

115.4’

Black Oak

106.0’ x 6.65’

Cucumber Magnolia

102.1’ x 7.39’

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Cornell Plantations June 7, 2015

Post by Erik Danielsen » Thu Apr 19, 2018 8:56 pm

That Ithaca valley is really turning out to be one of the state's hotspots with all the trees you keep turning up.

Those are some darn tall red hickories- but the shagbark really catches my eye. I sure hope we'll get one over 130' somewhere.

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