Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

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ElijahW
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Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

Re: Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

Post by ElijahW » Sun Feb 26, 2017 8:18 pm

NTS,

I ventured down to Fuertes yesterday in an effort to better document the largest Spicebushes. The area containing the biggest (and probably oldest) individuals was much smaller than I previously thought, limited to five or six plants. At least two exceed 20' in height, and probably one or two more. The plants range in circumference from 8 to 12 inches. The largest in terms of AF points seems to be the 26.1' x 1' individual, though I didn't measure any crown spreads due to strong winds.

I attempted to obtain an accurate remeasure of the tallest Freeman maple (the Red-Silver hybrid), but was thwarted by the wind. I got a laser hit on the base of the leader, at 130.5', but was unable to get the tree to hold still long enough to shoot the top twig. The tree should come out to somewhere between 131 and 132'. I was also able to find a couple of nice Green ashes, at 120.1' x 7'11" and 117.4' x 5'3". Jess's original assessment of this site has proven to be spot-on. Thanks, Jess.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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ElijahW
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Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

Re: Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

Post by ElijahW » Sun Mar 11, 2018 7:07 pm

NTS,

I made a couple brief trips down to Ithaca in the last week to check on the trees at the bird sanctuary. Tom Howard gave me the idea of volume modeling one of the giant cottonwoods, and I also had unfinished business from last year, namely getting a more accurate height reading on the tallest Freeman Maple.

The Maple was a little tricky and took several tries, but I settled on final dimensions of 132.3' x 10.57' (CBH). For the moment, I believe this is NY's tallest member of the Maple family. Ohio had a Freeman Maple just over 130' last I knew, but I haven't seen any updates on it lately.

Armed with my monocular, calculator, phone, and Trupulse, I took readings on one of the three 16'+ CBH cottonwoods at Fuertes. The main trunk, only ~42' long, was pretty easy to handle, but the limbs were more of a chore. I ended up with good numbers on the trunk and the smaller and shorter of the two main branches. The main trunk's volume came out to approximately 828'^3, just a little shy of my initial calculation last week. The smaller main limb and its accompanying branches came out to approximately 319'^3; multiplying by 2 and adding in the tops of the highest leaders came to approximately 644'^3. The total calculated volume (with conservative extrapolations) came out to approximately 1472'^3. I think a careful modeling of the entire crown would yield a few more cubes, but 1500 would be a stretch. The dimensions of this cottonwood are 132' x 16.56' (CBH). A second 16-footer also just makes the 130' mark, and a third is somewhere around 125', but has an enormous crown. I think the tree I measured ranks second or third in volume in the Fuertes stand.

A couple of additions to the Stewart Park height index:

Boxelder Acer negundo

81.2' x 4.39'
61.4' x 3.5'

Japanese Scholar Tree Styphnolobium japonicum

41.8' x 3.3'

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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dbhguru
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Re: Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

Post by dbhguru » Mon Mar 12, 2018 7:56 am

Elijah,

Good job! Assuming 1500 cubes, that cottonwood is doing a heck of a job sequestering carbon. Here's a rough calculation of the amount:

1500 ft^3 x 28 lb/ft^3 x 0.5 proportion of elemental carbon = 21,000 lbs. To hold this much carbon, the big tree needed to pull 21000 x 3.667 = 77,007 lbs of CO2 out of the air.

The 28 figure comes from "TECHNICAL NOTE NUMBER 218 FOREST PRODUCTS LABORATORY, U.S. FOREST SERVICE". The 3.667 number is the weight of a carbon dioxide molecule relative to the weight of a single carbon atom (44/12).

Shouldn't we give that fine cottonwood a prize or something?

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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ElijahW
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Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2011 4:04 pm

Re: Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

Post by ElijahW » Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:29 pm

Bob,

Those numbers are something else. There’s a lot of wood weight in that forest, even though Cottonwood is less dense than oak, for instance.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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dbhguru
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Re: Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

Post by dbhguru » Thu Mar 15, 2018 1:41 pm

Elijah,

I'm presently working on a PowerPoint Presentation that I'll be giving at the Hitchcock Center for the Environment in Amherst, MA on March 28th. The title of the presentation is The Untold Story of Carbon Storage Measurement in Trees and Forests. I've been working toward such a presentation for a long time. Our better methods of trunk volume measurement combined with tree-age dating, and standard species density and proportion of carbon statistics puts us in a good position to evaluate the carbon load held by some of the trees and forest sites that we study.

We're also in a good position to help set the record straight with respect to what young trees sequester, rates and amounts, relative to older trees. There's a mountain of data on that, some good, some not, but the really big trees are seldom included. We can give better estimates than what I often see coming from sources that rely on broad averages and data that come from highly controlled environments like tree plantations.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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