Page 1 of 1

Best Central NY Sites for Tree Species

Posted: Sat Jun 07, 2014 4:00 pm
by tomhoward
NTS,

Here are the best sites I know of in central NY for the following tree species:

* - Primary Old Growth Forest site

Eastern White Pine - Boat Launch Grove, Selkirk Shores State Park

Eastern Hemlock - Tuliptree Cathedral, Green Lakes State Park*

Northern White Cedar - Green Lakes SP*

Eastern Cottonwood - Fort Ontario State Historic Site, Oswego

Shagbark Hickory - Liverpool School Maple Grove*

Bitternut Hickory - Tuliptree Cathedral, Green Lakes SP*

American Beech - Liverpool School Maple Grove*

White Oak - North Syracuse Cemetery Oak Grove*, Wizard of Oz Memorial Oak Grove, North Syracuse*

Northern Red Oak - Wizard of Oz Memorial Oak Grove*, Green Lakes SP*, Old Growth Forest between Day Use Area and Campground – Selkirk Shores SP*, Recreation Park – Fulton, North Bay Campground – Fulton, Long Branch Park – Geddes, North Syracuse Cemetery Oak Grove*

Black Oak - Mt. Adnah Cemetery, Fulton

Tuliptree - Tuliptree Cathedral, Green Lakes SP*

Sassafras - near North Syracuse Cemetery Oak Grove

Black Cherry - “Sugar Bush”, Beaver Lake Nature Center, Lysander

Sugar Maple - Liverpool School Maple Grove*

Silver Maple - NYS Thruway Parking Area, westbound lane, west of Exit 33, Oneida County (these trees are probably Freeman Maples – hybrids between Red Maple and Silver Maple)

Red Maple - Liverpool School Maple Grove*

American Basswood - Green Lakes SP*

Black Gum - North Syracuse Cemetery Oak Grove*, Wizard of Oz Memorial Oak Grove*

Tom Howard

Re: Best Central NY Sites for Tree Species

Posted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 11:05 am
by Erik Danielsen
I would really like to get to green lakes sp sometime. I have quite a soft-spot for Northern Whitecedar and I sadly live just outside of its native range. Thanks for the guide!

Re: Best Central NY Sites for Tree Species

Posted: Sun Jun 15, 2014 1:51 pm
by tomhoward
Erik,

The White Cedars at Green Lakes are right by the shores of both lakes - a lot of people walk the trails that go right through them, but most don't seem to notice how special they are. They are old, gnarled trees, really picturesque when they lean out over the deep green-blue waters of these 2 rare meromictic lakes (these lakes do not have seasonal turnover as most lakes do).

There are also rugged old growth White Cedars at Clark Reservation State Park, and Chittenango Falls State Park.

Tom Howard