Howland's Island

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ElijahW
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by ElijahW » Sun Dec 08, 2013 6:39 pm

Jess, NTS,

I just entered Jess's measurements into the trees database http://treesdb.azurewebsites.net/Browse ... 50/Details. I hope everyone's doing well and staying warm.

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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ElijahW
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by ElijahW » Mon Dec 14, 2015 6:31 pm

NTS,

I made a trip out to Howland's Island earlier today to check on a few trees, and to enjoy the nearly 70 degree weather we're having. Here are a few measurements:

Area not previously visited on the northern tip of the Island within site of the Seneca River:

Tuliptree

130.1' (ties another tree nearby for highest on the Island)

American Sycamore

126.5' x 8'6" (tallest yet measured on the Island)
116.9' x 10'

Green Ash

110.3' x 7'9" (tallest yet measured on the Island; several more nearby close in height)

Yellow birch

93.6' x 4'3" (tallest yet measured on the Island)

Near the north end of the Island, I checked the height of a cottonwood originally measured in 2012 at 111'. Today, it came in a 117.9', or over six feet in three years. This tree's CBH was 14'6" in 2012, and I didn't update it today due to the large poison ivy vines wrapped around its trunk.

Hickory Hill (South Island):

I measured two pignut hickories previously believed be bitternuts with strange bark (I've learned a lot in the past couple of years).

111.7' x 6'3"
108.6' x 7'6"

The largest Northern red oak:

101.9' x 20'6"

I found a higher top on one of the remaining two healthy Sassafras:

91.2' x 4'5"

A previously unmeasured Blackgum:

83.5' x 5'

And to wrap it up, I finally found one of the trees I'd been looking for for several years, the former NY champion Chinkapin Oak (here's one for you Mark):

80.7' x 13'2" x 87' Average crown spread

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Matt Markworth
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by Matt Markworth » Mon Dec 14, 2015 8:03 pm

Elijah,

Awesome, thanks for the chinkapin oak! Wow, that's a big guy. I'll enter it into the database that I'm currently working on.

Matt

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ElijahW
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by ElijahW » Sat Dec 19, 2015 7:26 pm

NTS,

After a visit to the eastern part of Howlands Island this morning, I have some more updates:

Bitternut hickory

124.6' x 5'2"
122.5' Double-trunk
121.3' x 6'6"
120.7' x 5'4"
120.2' x 6'0"

Black locust

120.7' x 5'4" (118.8' in 2012)

American sycamore

119.0' x 12'4" (117.0 in 2012)

White ash

116.9' x 4'5"

Eastern cottonwood

125.8' x 11'8"
121.6' x 13'10" (120' in 2012)

Eastern white pine

120.0' x 4'9"
118.2' x 4'5" (114' in 2012)

Freeman maple

108.5' x 8'10"

Swamp white oak

94.1' x 8'3"

Norway spruce

111.4' x 5'9"

Quaking aspen

98.7' x 3'9"

Common serviceberry

48.2' x 2'4"

Unknown species

69.7' x 3'4"
62.8' x 3'2"

I have no photo for the mystery trees, but they have blocky, gray outer bark, very similar to dogwood or persimmon, and reddish-brown inner bark. What branching I could make out was alternate, and the twigs are thorny. I later came across several more of these trees with similar girths, though shorter heights. No leaves were still attached, and looking on the ground didn't help. No fruits were visible, either. My initial guess at the ID is European buckthorn, but I've never seen any this size, or with blocky bark. Could it be a hawthorn? Please help.

The height index for Howlands Island:

Tuliptree 130.1'
American sycamore 126.5'
Eastern cottonwood 125.8'
Bitternut hickory 124.6'
Black locust 120.7'
Eastern white pine 120.0'
White ash 116.9'
Shagbark hickory 114.7'
Black cherry 113.9'
American basswood 112.5'

Rucker 10 120.5'

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by Erik Danielsen » Sat Dec 19, 2015 8:56 pm

Those heights from white pine at such a svelte diameter really is something.

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ElijahW
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by ElijahW » Sat Dec 19, 2015 9:56 pm

Erik,

The 118' tree put on 4' in height in 3 years, but no girth. This tree and the 120-footer grow just a couple feet apart, and are just a stone's throw from several 120'+ bitternut hickories. All of the trees in this area are likely 80 years old or less. Anything new in NYC?

Elijah
"There is nothing in the world to equal the forest as nature made it. The finest formal forest, the most magnificent artificially grown woods, cannot compare with the grandeur of primeval woodland." Bob Marshall, Recreational Limitations to Silviculture in the Adirondacks

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by Erik Danielsen » Sun Dec 20, 2015 9:49 am

Yesterday I measured several white pines in a nearby park growing in mostly open conditions that are probably about the same age, no older. 102.2'/5.6"cbh, 104.4'/7.5"cbh. Seems Howland Island must have the secret sauce of competition, soils and moisture for those pines to really put it up there. The probable-state-champion tuliptree grows just a few hundred feet away (got a new height on it too!) so it's certainly a productive site for some species. Today I'm headed up to a secondary old-growth site in Manhattan (Inwood Hill Park). I should come back with some solid tulips and red oaks!

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George Fieo
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by George Fieo » Sun Dec 20, 2015 10:54 am

Erik,

My brother and I were in Inwood Park this past July. I didn't do any serious measuring. There is some great older growth tulips and red oak along some large outcrops. One tulip measured over 16' and is likely around 130'. The tops are beat up pretty well. On the other side of the trail opposite the old growth is a younger stand of tulips. A straight up shot with the rangefinder yielded one tulip to be in the upper 140's. now that the leaves are off a 150' tulip is probable. Also saw a nice cottonwood that is 17.5' in girth and between 105-110'.
Rob at the base of a large tulip polar.
Rob at the base of a large tulip polar.
Rob with a 17.5' cottonwood.
Rob with a 17.5' cottonwood.
Good luck today and I'm looking forward to hear what else you find.

George.

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Erik Danielsen
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by Erik Danielsen » Sun Dec 20, 2015 11:12 am

Thanks George, I'm now even more excited and appreciate the tip about the height on the younger tulips across the trail! If there is a 150', it'll be my first.

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tomhoward
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Re: Howland's Island

Post by tomhoward » Sun Dec 20, 2015 11:13 am

Elijah,

As far as I know, the Black Locust and Swamp White Oak at Howland's Island are the tallest in NY.

As for the mystery tree, I have no idea what it can be. It seems to be far too tall to be Hawthorn.

Tom Howard

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