Adirondack Adventures

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dbhguru
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Adirondack Adventures

Post by dbhguru » Wed Sep 14, 2011 7:07 pm

NTS,

Monica and I returned from the Dacks this afternoon. Our trip, which began on Sunday was an adventure, including a kind of tame tornado scare. Lee Frelich wouldn't have even blinked. But there is much to report on. It will take 3 or 4 postings, so I'd better get started. First off, when we arrived on Sunday, we met Matt Lyndacker, a logger who I've been corresponding for a year. Matt knew of a giant white pine that he wanted me to see and measure. Matt knows his pines and assured me that it wasn't a cheater. It took a long time to get to it, but once there - OMG!! Have a look. Be sure to double click on the images to get the expansion. The bigger the image, the more the impact.
Adirondacks-Lyndacker-Pine.jpg
Folks, it is stupendous. At 129.1 feet, its height isn't extraordinary, but its girth is a whopping 17.8 feet. I've roughed out its volume and am confident that it will go 1,200 cubes if not 1,250, and possibly 1,300. I'll explain the calculations in a future posting. But suffice it to say, the Lyndacker Pine is our largest measured to date for the species.

We canoed on 8th Lake, which is drop-dead gorgeous. Here are some images of 8th Lake.
Adirondacks-8th-Lake-1.jpg
Adirondacks-8th-Lake-2.jpg
But 8th Lake has competition. Here's an image of Moss Lake.
Adirondacks-Moss-Lake.jpg
Now for a gander at Raquette Lake
Adirondacks-Raquette-Lake.jpg
You say you want more lake images. Okay, try 7th Lake.
Adirondacks-7th-Lake.jpg
How about a sunset on 4th Lake taken from the ground of a historic inn?
Adirondacks-4th-Lake.jpg
Folks, the Adirondacks are a jewel beyond description. More tomorrow. The Dacks Rule.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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James Parton
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Re: Adirondack Adventures

Post by James Parton » Wed Sep 14, 2011 11:25 pm

Bob,

Damn what a pine! It's huge. When I first looked at the image I was guessing 16 ft class which is still super-massive but 17.8 is almost unbelievable. And I think a 13 ft class tree is big. All I can say is WoW!!

Beautiful lakes. You have became quite a photographer my friend.
James E Parton
Ovate Course Graduate - Druid Student
Bardic Mentor
New Order of Druids

http://www.druidcircle.org/nod/index.ph ... Itemid=145

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dbhguru
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Re: Adirondack Adventures

Post by dbhguru » Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:27 am

James,

Thanks much. Many of the Adirondack scenes nearly photograph themselves. The blend of mountains, lakes, forest, and sky is a hallmark of the north country. But the Dacks possess each feature in abundance.

The Lyndacker Pine is enormous. Matt's grandfather first introduced him to the tree. It has been around a long time.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Marcboston
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Re: Adirondack Adventures

Post by Marcboston » Thu Sep 15, 2011 10:24 am

I did some hiking up in the Dacks this year for the first time. I was blown away how nice it was. It exceed my expectations. My friend and I bagged Mt Marcy and Algonquin. There was a triathlon taking place the time we were to leave so we took a longer way back out and drove by a bunch of lakes. Long Lake was really impressive. The lakes and mountains make for some very nice shots and like Bob said nearly photograph themselves.

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Neil
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Re: Adirondack Adventures

Post by Neil » Fri Sep 16, 2011 6:57 am

nice pix, Bob!

the Lake District of the ADKs are probably overlooked because of the High Peaks region (double pun there?), but it is a shame. i've started hiking to the hidden and not so hidden wilderness lakes and ponds in that area. simply sublime.

and, there is some interesting historical forest data from that general area from more than 110 years ago. as they were logging the forest, Henry S. Graves, one of the first foresters in the US, was up there making observations, conducting research and writing about it. He even has some suggestions on "practical forestry." it is a nice piece of ancient US forestry literature. a lot of dimensional and growth observations and some rough estimates of ages in the Original ADK forest: http://openlibrary.org/works/OL1470871W ... dirondacks

thanks for sharing!
neil

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dbhguru
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Re: Adirondack Adventures

Post by dbhguru » Fri Sep 16, 2011 7:36 am

Neil,

Every time I visit the Dacks, my love for that outstanding region grows and I continue to be amazed at how many areas survived the logging era. I think Michael Kudish puts the area of first growth at approaching 500,000 acres. This includes wetland areas of red maple, tamarack, balsam fir, and black spruce - no big or particularly old trees, but never logged.

In terms of my quarry, there are numerous areas along Route 28 between Raquette Lake and Inlet where old to very old white pines thrust their crowns above the hardwood canopy. They look tall, but often aren't in terms of the tallest we have in the East, but they are still tall enough to make a visual impact. I expect that there are numerous spots that harbor a scattering of large white pines worth visiting and measuring. But I never expected a behemoth like the Lyndacker Pine to have survived the timbering period. I presume that its multi-stemmed was why it was bypassed. However, there are other pines in the area that weren't cut that are single-trunked. My guess is that these pines are between 175 and 200 years old. That puts them before the onset of the logging era.

On my next visit, I plan to document and measure as many as I can get to. I'll also get GPS coordinates of them so we can see their dispersal pattern on a map. Here are some more images from our Adirondack high. First image shows Moss Lake. I couldn't get the camera quite level. Sorry, everybody.
Adirondacks-Moss-Lake.jpg
Next images shows red pines near Raquette Lake. My guess is that they are between 150 and 200 years old.
Adirondacks-Red Pines.jpg
Here is the profile of an old white pine that stands out boldly against the sky. As you know, such scenes are Adirondack classics.
Adirondacks-Old Pine.jpg
And then there are the island pines. Old forms that capture one's attention. I couldn't spot any place to land our canoe on this island in Seventh Lake.
Adirondacks-Old Pines-2.jpg
Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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edfrank
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Re: Adirondack Adventures

Post by edfrank » Fri Sep 16, 2011 12:33 pm

Neil wrote:nice pix, Bob!

There is some interesting historical forest data from that general area from more than 110 years ago. as they were logging the forest, Henry S. Graves, one of the first foresters in the US, was up there making observations, conducting research and writing about it. He even has some suggestions on "practical forestry." it is a nice piece of ancient US forestry literature. a lot of dimensional and growth observations and some rough estimates of ages in the Original ADK forest: http://openlibrary.org/works/OL1470871W ... dirondacks

thanks for sharing!
neil
Neil,

The link listed does not have a readable version of the document, and I have failed to find a copy online. I am sure it contains many gems.

I did go to archive.org and found quite a few interesting looking old books available about the Adirondacks:

http://www.archive.org/search.php?query ... xts&page=1

These include some history of the region, accounts of the area, guidebooks, illustrations, photos, and even a document encouraging the creation of the Adirondack and Catskill parks. For those interested in the area, these documents - free for download - are worth a look.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Larry Tucei
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Re: Adirondack Adventures

Post by Larry Tucei » Fri Sep 16, 2011 9:31 pm

Bob, OMG, What a monster Pine. That bark sure is odd looking. Great photos of the lakes. I bet there is plenty of good fishing in all those locations. In October I'll start reporting from some Forest locations. One of my first stops will be the Pascagoula River Basin. Lots of big Cypress. Larry

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edfrank
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Re: Adirondack Adventures

Post by edfrank » Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:34 pm

Adirondack Forest Project

NTS,

There have been a number of excellent posts made on the Adirondacks in NY. These have been recent reports by Robert Leverett and Jess Riddle. In the past we have had posts by Barry Caselli, Eli Dickerson, Tom Howard. Neil Pederson has done research there. John Davis lives within the park. Many others have visited the area. It is a major old-growth forest site. I think we should add this as a focus area by naming it an official NTS project. We could mark out what we have done. Contact Michael Kudish and see if we can add his research to the mixture.

Ed Frank
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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dbhguru
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Re: Adirondack Adventures

Post by dbhguru » Sat Sep 17, 2011 7:19 am

Ed,

Let's go for it. The Adirondacks is a region of unlimited possibilities for ENTS. There are trees and forest communities to report on, contacts to be made, a story to be told, and official NTS recognition to be awarded.

The Dacks seem limitless when hiking their trails or standing on a summit looking toward the horizon. There are countless lakes and ponds to explore. In addition, there are patches of old growth that have never been explored. The acreage of "first forest" may never be accurately mapped. Estimates of its extent range from over 200,000 acres to half a million. The latter estimate includes wetland areas, but the big tree OG is almost certainly not less that 300,000 acres. It would be a very worthwhile project to start putting dots on the map with data to go with them, and when it comes to collecting reliable tree numbers, we're the only show in town.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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