The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Moderators: edfrank, dbhguru

User avatar
John Harvey
Posts: 748
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:25 pm

The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by John Harvey » Mon Feb 02, 2015 7:33 am

As many of you know by now I'm moving to the San Fran area in a few days and my big tree hunting will have some big changes. I guess what the group can expect from me in the future is... basically more of the same only with different species of course. The redwoods will be explored, measured, and photographed like they are by many others but a big focus of mine are other species like Coast Live Oak, Valley Oak, Blue Gum, Doug Fir, Monterrey Cypress, and Sitka Spruce. I already have my eye on some unmeasured oaks in Sonoma county on private vineyards. I will be back in NJ for two weeks in the summer to check up on some of the trees here and do some more exploring and measuring.
I have spent a lot of time thinking about what I will miss most here in Jersey like my job, family, and friends but I figured Id post here about the trees I will miss the most from my homeland.

1. American Beech: There really isn't a replacement for this tree out there. The bark and the old carvings...it will be missed.
2. American Sycamore: I know there are California Sycamore there but to me they just aren't the same. Not as grand, no way.
3. Tulip Poplar: My first tree love. Sure the redwoods tall and untapering trunks will make up for them, but no west coast broadleaf really compares.
4. Atlantic White Cedar: Its hard to think I will miss a coniferous tree there but this is the one I will miss.

Trees I will not miss at all:

Pitch Pine: Please no more pinus rigida. Ugly, scrubby, yuck.
Norway Maple: No explanation needed.

Question. If you suddenly moved away from every single tree species you know and love, what would you miss the most?
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

User avatar
Will Blozan
Posts: 1153
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:13 pm

Re: The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by Will Blozan » Mon Feb 02, 2015 8:23 am

Best of luck on your transition! Don't forget tanoak and rhododendron.

You need to see the s. App pitch pines. they don't suck at all! Sorry they left you with a bad impression...

Will

User avatar
Erik Danielsen
Posts: 864
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 5:46 pm

Re: The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by Erik Danielsen » Mon Feb 02, 2015 8:34 am

With all the focus on giant conifers, western hardwoods have really been piquing my curiosity. Glad to hear you'll be out there measuring some!

Fagaceae has some other interesting members out there aside from quercus and tanoak. I've got a hankering to see a Golden Chinkapin.

Good luck with your move!

User avatar
Larry Tucei
Posts: 2017
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 10:44 am

Re: The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by Larry Tucei » Mon Feb 02, 2015 9:31 am

Here's some of the species I'd love to measure of course Oaks- Live Oak- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_agrifolia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_lobata The Valley or White Oak is a giant of a tree and I have to get out to Cal and meaured some. Also all the conifers- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinus_lambertiana Even though I would miss my southern trees if I had to leave I would just enjoy the new adventure. These are but of a few of the awesome trees out there have fun, good luck and good tree hunting. Look forward for some Oak stuff. Larry

User avatar
PAwildernessadvocate
Posts: 389
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2010 3:31 pm

Re: The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by PAwildernessadvocate » Mon Feb 02, 2015 9:46 am

JohnnyDJersey wrote: Question. If you suddenly moved away from every single tree species you know and love, what would you miss the most?
Conifers: Eastern white pine and Eastern hemlock.

Deciduous: tulip poplar and cucumber magnolia.

I named two of each but really there are a lot more. A big reason I returned to the East after living in Washington for four years, and going to grad school there, was because I missed the Eastern forests. As much as I loved the Pacific NW temperate rainforests.
"There is no better way to save biodiversity than by preserving habitat, and no better habitat, species for species, than wilderness." --Edward O. Wilson

tclikesbigtrees
Posts: 159
Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2013 2:08 pm

Re: The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by tclikesbigtrees » Mon Feb 02, 2015 10:27 am

I am sad to see you go. There are a lot of trees in New Jersey and the surrounding areas that I would not have known about and where they are if it were not for you. It is too bad that we did not get to formally meet.

Thank You,
Tom

User avatar
dbhguru
Posts: 4507
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:34 pm

Re: The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by dbhguru » Mon Feb 02, 2015 11:17 am

John,

Ditto to what the others have said. Sad NJ will lose you, but mightily relieved that NTS won't lose you. California is huge and needs many Cadre members.

I presume that you won't make it to Cook Forest in April. We could do the Cadre thing long distance when you get settled.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

User avatar
John Harvey
Posts: 748
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:25 pm

Re: The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by John Harvey » Mon Feb 02, 2015 11:25 am

Thanks everyone for the best wishes. Will, I'm just used to the pine barrens I guess with the short and twisted pinus rigida.
Tom, Ill be around in the summers a little so we can always meet up sometime and do some hunting/measuring. Plus I will always give you my latest google earth files so you can see the trees. I'm glad I've had you and your brother here to chat with and share tree locations. Actually Barrys older post were how I found NTS in the first place a few years ago.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

User avatar
John Harvey
Posts: 748
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 8:25 pm

Re: The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by John Harvey » Mon Feb 02, 2015 11:34 am

Bob,
I am still going to try and make it to Cook SF in April. It really depends on how settled we are by then I guess. But yes if I cant I will work long distance with you and the team. California is indeed a huge state with a relatively small amount of guys/gals measuring and documenting. There are a few very talented explorers and photographers like Max, Yinghai, Mario ect but seems to be even less guys doing the kind of detailed and precise measurements like Mike Taylor and Zane Moore do.
John D Harvey (JohnnyDJersey)

East Coast and West Coast Big Tree Hunter

"If you look closely at a tree you'll notice it's knots and dead branches, just like our bodies. What we learn is that beauty and imperfection go together wonderfully." - Matt Fox

User avatar
Don
Posts: 1569
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:42 am

Re: The big move to California, the trees I leave behind :(

Post by Don » Mon Feb 02, 2015 12:41 pm

John-
While my view of New Jersey is limited (your posts have enlightened that), as a native northern Californian, as a tree guy you've a whole world before you. While San Francisco IS a large metropolis, the coast range to the north and south is one of (usually) abundant sun and precip...a good combination. Cross the Central Valley, and you've the Sierra Nevadas which other than the 5 or 6 crossings are very much characterized by national forests, national parks, and wildernesses...PRIME tree hunting terrain. Then there's the Warner Range in far north eastern California, the Inyo and White Mountains in the far eastern reaches of California, and to the south there are several mountain ranges harboring hidden rare species waiting for exploration!
As a urban tree hunter, you've shined in New Jersey...so shall you have the opportunity in California, with many communities having been around in California's optimum climate for tree growth.
Here's a roughly 13' diameter sample...: > )
A winter sentry...
A winter sentry...
Don Bertolette - President/Moderator, WNTS BBS
Restoration Forester (Retired)
Science Center
Grand Canyon National Park

BJCP Apprentice Beer Judge

View my Alaska Big Tree List Webpage at:
http://www.akbigtreelist.org

Post Reply

Return to “New Jersey”