On Golden Pond

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Joe

Re: On Golden Pond

Post by Joe » Tue Aug 30, 2011 7:38 am

dbhguru wrote:James,

I wouldn't be surprised. Red pine is Monica's favorite species.

Bob
Bob, you mean you haven't informed Monica that the state of Mass. DCR considers it a horrible, foreign species unworthy of living in our state?
Joe

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dbhguru
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Re: On Golden Pond

Post by dbhguru » Tue Aug 30, 2011 5:10 pm

Joe,

No, I've been mum on that message. Native red pine is what she really likes. The older ones get the really red bark and she finds them very aesthetic.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Marcboston
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Re: On Golden Pond

Post by Marcboston » Wed Aug 31, 2011 9:48 pm

Great shots. Did you take them with your Iphone?

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dbhguru
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Re: On Golden Pond

Post by dbhguru » Thu Sep 01, 2011 7:23 am

Marc,

No, I used a Nikon Coolpix S9100. My buddy Don Bertolette helped me make the selection when we were in Pocatello, ID in July. I've been lazy about learning how to use its plethora of features. It tends to over-expose. There are ways to compensate, and then there is always the software solution.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

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Rand
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Re: On Golden Pond

Post by Rand » Thu Sep 01, 2011 9:59 am

dbhguru wrote:Marc,

No, I used a Nikon Coolpix S9100. My buddy Don Bertolette helped me make the selection when we were in Pocatello, ID in July. I've been lazy about learning how to use its plethora of features. It tends to over-expose. There are ways to compensate, and then there is always the software solution.

Bob
Look up 'Exposure Compensation' in the manual. It will be a a little sliding dial -2,-1,0,+1,+2. Plus makes the pictures brighter, minus is darker. While software can help quite a bit to fix a picture, there is no substitute for getting the exposure correct.

On my camera at least, the preview of the image will flash hash marks on the over/under exposed area of the image. This tells you the picture is completely white or completely black in this area. No software can fix these area of the image if this happens. It can only fudge the brightness levels of the rest of the picture, which does help, but not as much as getting it right the first time.

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Rand
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Re: On Golden Pond

Post by Rand » Thu Sep 01, 2011 2:16 pm

I downloaded the manual for the camera and found the relevant pages for exposure compensation.
http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals/nop ... oprint.pdf

First you are looking for the 'Rotary multi selector'. It's the big donut shaped button on the back (#2 in the diagram below)
CP-p5.jpg
And then read p. 44 and fiddle with it:
cp-p40.jpg
Once I figured out this feature on my camera I got a lot better color in my landscape pictures. For example here's a picture taken in Durango last summer:
Screen shot 2011-09-01 at 3.09.29 PM.jpg
Would have been a beautiful picture but the over-exposure blew out the sky and washed out the colors of everything else. The 'everything else' was largely fixable in software but the sky is still gone:
Screen shot 2011-09-01 at 3.12.28 PM.jpg
The sky should have been a brilliant turquoise blue:
Screen shot 2011-09-01 at 3.17.09 PM.jpg

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dbhguru
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Re: On Golden Pond

Post by dbhguru » Thu Sep 01, 2011 3:20 pm

Rand,

Thanks. I have been using the exposure adjustment feature you identified. Without it, I would have had hopelessly over-exposed images, but I still can't get the sky right. I think my expectations were unrealistic. I have to pay more attention to those highly illuminated spots that overpower everything else. I guess midday has never been a good time to take serious photos regardless of a camera's features.

Bob
Robert T. Leverett
Co-founder, Native Native Tree Society
Co-founder and President
Friends of Mohawk Trail State Forest
Co-founder, National Cadre

Joe

Re: On Golden Pond

Post by Joe » Thu Sep 01, 2011 6:33 pm

dbhguru wrote:Rand,

Thanks. I have been using the exposure adjustment feature you identified. Without it, I would have had hopelessly over-exposed images, but I still can't get the sky right. I think my expectations were unrealistic. I have to pay more attention to those highly illuminated spots that overpower everything else. I guess midday has never been a good time to take serious photos regardless of a camera's features.

Bob
Do you use a polarizing filter? That's designed to bring out the sky vs. clouds. Regarding higly illuminated spots- as I've been saying when contemplating doing a video of you measuring trees, a bright sunny day ain't gonna work- what's best, in my rank amateur opinion, is a bright cloudy day to avoid shadows. The pros of course use heavy heavy duty lighting to overcome too much sun to kill the shadows.

Regardless, Bob, you're photography is excellent! I noticed a few shots too dark- only due to your camera not having a powerful flash- these light weight digital cameras don't have much for flash power. Still, I love these cameras for ease of use and I can take over 1,000 14 meg pictures! Makes it worth if if many don't look good.
Joe

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edfrank
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Re: On Golden Pond

Post by edfrank » Thu Sep 01, 2011 6:42 pm

Bob,

Your photography overall is fine. You have produced many fantastic photos. It is just the nature of the beast that not every photo turns out well no matter how experienced you are and how good of equipment you have. My only suggestion is to see if your camera has an auto-bracket function (I am sure it does) See my last post concerning the laurel photos ( http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f ... 908#p11629 ). Just keep taking photos, break the rules, experiment. The images are essentially free when you take them, so take lots and take photos of everything. Think about what you are doing and keep doing whatever works for you.

Ed
"I love science and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awe by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and revigorate it." by Robert M. Sapolsky

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Rand
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Re: On Golden Pond

Post by Rand » Thu Sep 01, 2011 6:48 pm

dbhguru wrote:Rand,

Thanks. I have been using the exposure adjustment feature you identified. Without it, I would have had hopelessly over-exposed images, but I still can't get the sky right. I think my expectations were unrealistic. I have to pay more attention to those highly illuminated spots that overpower everything else. I guess midday has never been a good time to take serious photos regardless of a camera's features.

Bob
Yeah, that's very true. I tend to get my best pictures an hour or too before sundown (I'm too lazy to get up with the sun in the morning). The real dinger with camera's is that their dynamic range of light to dark is still noticeably less than the human eye. There is software that does HDR (high dynamic range) processing that lets you combine several photographs of the same subject at different exposure levels into a single image that captures the full range of light to dark in the scene (Auto bracketing as Ed notes, takes the multiple exposures automatically). Photomatix is one example I've played with, but there are others out there:

http://www.hdrsoft.com/

You might also try reducing the camera's ISO (light sensitivity, p 52). That does help occasionally in my experience. Other than that, the next best thing is try to keep your back to the sun, because the sky is actually brighter the closer to the sun you get, even if the sun isn't visible in the scene.

But as Ed said, your most important instrument, your photographer's eye, is working fine.

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